MyCoE

Computing Resources for Students

Facilities

The Dabble Lab is a high- and low-tech maker space environment that features 3-D printers, a laser cutter, art and design tools such as advanced sewing machines, small tools and workspace for printed circuit board and interactive electronic objects work, a kiln and a ventilated booth for spray painting.

The MILL maker space is a high- and low-tech environment that features 3-D printers, a laser cutter, art and design tools such as advanced sewing machines, small tools and workspace for printed circuit board and interactive electronic objects work, a kiln, and a ventilated booth for spray painting. Come to the Maker Space and make the most of a social, multidiciplinary and collaborative environment that connects you with UW's creative community and with the tools and resources to build and prototype your next great idea!

The Engineering Student Computer Lab has 36 workstations in an open room, plus 3 small rooms for groups of up to 4 students to work collaboratively around one computer with a 46-inch monitor. The lab is open to all UW Engineering students.

Software and server access

UW Software (U Ware) »
Download software at reduced or no cost, thanks to various license agreements with software vendors.
Remote Application Server »
The College's RemoteApp cluster allows students to run specialized software remotely on personally owned Windows and Mac computers without needing to install the app on their systems.
Research Computing Club »
The Research Computing Club facilitates access to and training for UW’s shared super computing cluster, Hyak.

Hyak, the UW’s supercomputer, is helping researchers understand how biomolecules interact with one another — opening the door to advances in chemical engineering

CH2M HILL Foundation logo and link

Chemical Engineering Ph.D. candidate Sarah Alamdari studies the movement of atoms, which requires massive computing time.

Measuring the movement of atoms, and their interactions with other atoms can help researchers gain insight into the behavior of biological systems, including our own bodies. That knowledge, in turn, can lead to other discoveries, such as finding dental prosthetics that can better withstand the strong chemistry inside the mouth.

But studying the behavior of atoms requires massive amounts of computing time, and can be prohibitively expensive. It took a full month of continuous, intensive computing calculations on the UW’s on-site shared cluster supercomputer, Hyak, to help Alamdari capture how a handful of proteins interface with the surface of the tooth.

Without the power of Hyak, this research would not be possible.

"Hyak was one of the factors that attracted me to the UW. Having a research computing tool such as Hyak right here at the UW is incredibly valuable." — Sarah Alamdari

Read the full article »