Industry & Alumni

Industry-Sponsored Student Capstone Projects

In the 2017/18 academic year the industry capstone program was supported by 16 sponsoring companies and 28 real-world projects. 143 students from six departments in the College of Engineering participated. Scroll down to learn more about each project.

Our 2017-2018 sponsors

AeroTEC

Trailing Pressure Measurement System

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Trailing Pressure Measurement System
Students:
Zachary Rotter, aeronautics and astronautics
Laura Smit, aeronautics and astronautics
Kirby Taylor, aeronautics and astronautics
Bohao Zhu, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Chris Lum, Research Assistant Professor, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

One of AeroTEC’s main focuses is flight testing, and they are continuously looking for ways to improve the process. Trailing cones have long been used to measure static pressure accurately away from the local disturbances caused by the aircraft. Some issues with typical trailing cone systems are broken pressure lines, pressure lag, and position inaccuracies in dive conditions. The student team worked to develop a more accurate trailing cone system.

A group of students

AT&T

LTE Antenna for Tethered Drones

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
LTE Antenna for Tethered Drones
Students:
Musaad Alolayan, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Tarik Haj-Khalil, aeronautics and astronautics
Essey Reda, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Timothy Ro, aeronautics and astronautics
Faculty Adviser:
Adam Bruckner, Professor Emeritus, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

AT&T has an existing tethered drone solution with onboard LTE radios and antennas to provide temporary cellular coverage to first responders and to the public after a natural disaster or other network impacting events. Payload weight and space are limited on drones, so AT&T would like to explore the potential of long wire (aka random wire) antennas integrated into the existing tether in place of traditional LTE antennas mounted on the drone. The student team worked to research, develop, test, and evaluate a long wire antenna to provide public LTE transmit and receive services from a drone.

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Blue Origin

New Glenn Booster Robotic Approach

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
New Glenn Booster Robotic Approach
Students:
Julianna Bethune, aeronautics and astronautics
Nicholas Greenwood, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Jonathan Hall, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Trevor Hedges, aeronautics and astronautics
Nathan Mars, aeronautics and astronautics
Aaron Misola, aeronautics and astronautics
Cole Morgan, aeronautics and astronautics
Thomas Pryor, aeronautics and astronautics
Faculty Adviser:
Kristi A. Morgansen, Professor and Interim Chair, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

The New Glenn 1st stage booster will land down range autonomously on a vessel out at sea. After landing, it will need to connect to the vehicle for power, communications, and nitrogen supply. Ideally, these connections would happen as soon after landing as possible to minimize the need to carry these commodities onboard. For safety reasons, the landing vessel will not have people on it during the landing operation. Some amount of time is required to safe the vehicle prior to transferring personnel back onto the vessel. The team worked to create a robotic system that can approach the vehicle and make these connections shortly after landing to significantly increase operational capability.

A group of students

Boeing

Additive Manufacturing of Metals Lattice Structures for Energy Absorption

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Additive Manufacturing of Metals Lattice Structures for Energy Absorption
Students:
Simar Bassi, mechanical engineering
Son Q. Luong, mechanical engineering
Jagbir Singh, mechanical engineering
Sameer D. Meshram, mechanical engineering
Samuel Sexton, mechanical engineering
Marwin Tarusna, mechanical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Dwayne Arola, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
Ramulu Mamidala, Boeing-Pennell Professor of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering
Junlan Wang, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The team explored and improved designs of additive manufactured metal lattices for applications requiring high energy absorption. They adopted feasible lattice designs, assessed their properties by experiments and modeling, and improved the designs to maximum performance and efficiency.

A group of students

Boeing

EE Bay Box Handling Device

Sponsor:
Project Name:
EE Bay Box Handling Device
Students:
Cameron Gostin, mechanical engineering
Tristan Oakes, mechanical engineering
Tomas Romero, mechanical engineering
John Taft, mechanical engineering/materials science & engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Vipin Kumar, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The students worked to develop a device or system to assist mechanics with their work of removing and replacing electrical boxes in the 737 EE Bay during preflight operations. Airplane Maintenance Technicians (AMT’s) manually remove malfunctioning electrical boxes from a small space that is difficult to reach, and then replace the boxes. They must extend their arms and shoulders and apply force while removing the box. Risks that can lead to injuries occur when reaching, pulling, lifting and lowering the boxes. Damage can occur to the product if the box comes into contact with the airplane structure or is dropped. The team developed a prototype material handling device to help remove and replace boxes in the 737 EE Bay, reducing injury risk for this manual task, and formed solutions for handling boxes into and out of place in 737 EE Bay.

A group of students

Boeing

FSAE Composite Accumulator Box

Sponsor:
Project Name:
FSAE Composite Accumulator Box
Students:
Dhruv Kapoor, mechanical engineering
Hsu-Sheng Ko, mechanical engineering
Kara Krebs, mechanical engineering
Anna von Ravensberg, mechanical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Ashley Emery, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The team set out to design an improved accumulator box for an electric car, focusing on weight savings and improving general composites knowledge. They created a master composite testing document to specify laminate design for different sandwich panels.

A group of students

Boeing

Hybrid-Electric STOL Air Taxi Design

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Hybrid-Electric STOL Air Taxi Design
Students:
Jordan Ho, aeronautics and astronautics
Cory Lock, aeronautics and astronautics
Max McDonald, aeronautics and astronautics
Ashenafi Mendera, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Mozhgan Mirarabshahi, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Pierce Paynter, aeronautics and astronautics
Andrew Quam, aeronautics and astronautics
Ben Rizzardi, aeronautics and astronautics
Severiano Sandomirsky, aeronautics and astronautics
Faculty Adviser:
Behcet Acikmese, Associate Professor, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
JK Yang, Assistant Professor, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

The team set out to design a Hybrid-Electric STOL air taxi. The entry into service (EIS) is 2028 for a STOL 4-seater with 400 nmi of range. The intent is to have energy storage to supplement takeoff, climb, go-around and emergencies via batteries and electric motors with an engine providing additional power and/or direct propulsion for cruise to extend the range and recharge the batteries during cruise. The team worked to create a white paper design report, to be improved upon by future teams to eventually create a proof of concept UAS demonstrator.

A group of students

Boeing

Manufacturing Impacts of Thermoplastic and Thermoset Composites

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Manufacturing Impacts of Thermoplastic and Thermoset Composites
Students:
Shawn Baker, materials science & engineering
Sean Ghods, materials science & engineering
Erik Johnson, materials science & engineering
Gavin Ray, materials science & engineering
Nik Atikah Roslam, materials science & engineering
Syafiaah Samsul, materials science & engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Dwayne Arola, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
About the Project:

Most composites used in automotive or aerospace industries are based on a polymeric matrix carbon fiber reinforced prepreg. The structural behavior of these composites is dominated by the carbon fiber, but the manufacturing and processing behavior is dominated by the matrix. As production and manufacturing technologies continue to evolve to address cost, rate, safety, environmental and other needs, there is increasing opportunity to develop and select composite materials based on the impact that they make in the production environment. Boeing, and the industry in general, is moving towards industrialization of composites to enable lower cost materials and processing of composite structure. This is being driven by increased use of composite material, automated processing, and higher production rates. Understanding the influence and opportunity space for different matrix materials will enable more efficient selection and use of composites. These benefits will ultimately extend beyond the current air travel paradigm helping to enable low cost, high performance rapid transit solutions of the future. The team worked to explore and understand the role of the matrix material on manufacturing, focusing on current and emerging technologies for fabrication, and assessing the distinct benefits that each matrix enables.

A group of students

Boeing

Service Hatch Structural Design

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Service Hatch Structural Design
Students:
Surafel Abeel, mechanical engineering
Collin Berg, mechanical engineering
Adrian Camacho, mechanical engineering
Trevor Palmer, mechanical engineering
Melanie Wullaert, mechanical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Dwayne Arola, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
Ramulu Mamidala, Boeing-Pennell Professor of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering
Junlan Wang, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The team explored new design options for airplane service hatches to reduce the cost of the airplane. They provided a structural analysis for existing and new design options, and created a business case that compares the total manufacturing cost of new design options versus the existing Boeing designs.

A group of students

Boeing

Tie Rod Structure Design Project

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Tie Rod Structure Design Project
Students:
Nick Christoforou, mechanical engineering
Jake Owin Ell, industrial & systems engineering
Jessy Ha, mechanical engineering
Madelyn Lew, mechanical engineering
Rungpatch Nethnapat, industrial & systems engineering
Gregory Peterson, industrial & systems engineering
Jasdip Singh, mechanical engineering
Minh-Thu Tran, mechanical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Ashis Banerjee, Assistant Professor, Industrial & Systems Engineering
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
Corie Cobb, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The team worked to explore new design options for tie-rods that can be used in the majority of Boeing airplane locations and reduce the cost of the airplane. They conducted a design analysis of their new concepts and used 3D printing to prototype and test their designs. They also completed a business case that compares the total production cost of their recommended design versus the existing baseline Boeing designs.

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Crowley Maritime

Tug Boat Dispatch Support Tool

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Tug Boat Dispatch Support Tool
Students:
Elizabeth Georg, industrial & systems engineering
Logan Jungkuntz, industrial & systems engineering
Kathleen Karlson, industrial & systems engineering
Maxwell Laroche, industrial & systems engineering
John Macmillan, industrial & systems engineering
Molly O‘Brien, industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

Crowley Maritime uses centralized dispatchers to facilitate tug boat work in the Los Angeles/Long Beach, San Francisco/Oakland and Puget Sound harbors. The role of these dispatchers is to coordinate matches between tugs and incoming vessels and to resolve scheduling conflicts that occur when multiple vessels arrive and require more tugs than are available at that time. In these cases, dispatchers have the ability to hire competitors’ tugs in order to complete the job on thier behalf. This is known as subbing out work. This project focused on resolving these scheduling conflicts in the most efficient way possible by developing a tool to assist in the decision making capabilities of the dispatchers, using their decision making guidelines.

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Genie

Genie Roundabout Production Line Footprint Optimization

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Genie Roundabout Production Line Footprint Optimization
Students:
David Imanuel, industrial & systems engineering
Matthew Lin, industrial & systems engineering
Gavin McPherson, industrial & systems engineering
Dennis Muljadi, industrial & systems engineering
Connor Wong, industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

Genie is constantly working towards improving its facilities by optimizing material flow and consolidating floor space. Currently, building 6 is in the process of moving its assembly lines within the building to improve material flow and optimize floorspace. GR (Genie Runabout) production line was recently moved to its interim location to help facilitate other line moves. To align with the final future state of the production facility, the GR line will need to move again with a reduced footprint. The student team was tasked with analyzing the current state of the GR production line (assembly and weld) and subsequently identifying areas of improvement, including method, machine, manpower or material (4M) related. The team developed a future state layout with the reduced footprint (target reduction ~40%) and validated the changes through simulations.

A group of students

GKN Aerospace

Effect of Embedded Dissimilar Materials on the Fatigue Life of Honeycomb Panels

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Effect of Embedded Dissimilar Materials on the Fatigue Life of Honeycomb Panels
Students:
Siqi Chen, aeronautics and astronautics
Timothy Gormley, aeronautics and astronautics
Shida Xu, aeronautics and astronautics
Faculty Adviser:
Marco Salviato, Assistant Professor, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

GKN Aerospace forms titanium honeycombs panels at elevated temperature. In order to prevent the contamination of the titanium, the parts are covered with stainless steel foil. The high temperature and high contact pressure may cause steel particles to be embedded in the titanium face sheet. The student team set out to create a numerical method to simulate the effect of the embedded steel particles on the titanium face sheet mechanical properties, and recommend a solution.

A group of students

GKN Aerospace

Flow Characteristics of Manufacturing Defects on Lip Skins and the Effect on Specific Fuel Consumption

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Flow Characteristics of Manufacturing Defects on Lip Skins and the Effect on Specific Fuel Consumption
Students:
Andrew Brodsky, materials science & engineering
Jeremy Hall, aeronautics and astronautics
Asia Morris, aeronautics and astronautics
Pablo Trefftz Posada, aeronautics and astronautics
Faculty Adviser:
Antonino Ferrante, Associate Professor, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Tony Waas, Boeing-Edtvedt Chair, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

The team set out to study the lip skin manufacturing defects for mid-size aircrafts such as the 737Max, and how they affect the Specific Fuel Consumption. They worked to describe all the defects and their influence on the Specific Fuel Consumption, and used geometric data to predict the effects and quantify the percentage Specific Fuel Consumption increase due to these effects (waviness, roughness, change of thickness), resulting in a parametric trade study and a simple model.

Hexcel

Ergonomic Risk Reduction for Hand Layup of Composites

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Ergonomic Risk Reduction for Hand Layup of Composites
Students:
Parker Cole, industrial & systems engineering
Roman Fomin,industrial & systems engineering
Trenton Lam, industrial & systems engineering
Adrian Steeler Magallanes, industrial & systems engineering
David Setiawan Tjahjadi, mechanical engineering
Marverick Tjeng, mechanical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
Pete Johnson, Professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Adjunct Professor, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

While automation of composite laminates is increasing across the aerospace industry, there remains a large sector of composite parts that require hand lamination of prepreg materials. This may be due to complexity of the part, low build rates, or continued build of legacy work. The force and dexterity required to sweep fabric into defined tool features takes its toll on the human body, often causing wrist, elbow, and shoulder discomfort. The student team set out to develop the next step in sweeping technology, with a goal to reduce or eliminate ergonomic exposures while not impeding the ability to manually sweep materials into place. Students developed concepts for sweep designs to alleviate high risk activities, tested and analyzed sweep design concepts, and determined how to accurately detect muscle strain based on the required work.

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MOD Pizza

Labor and Deployment Model

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Labor and Deployment Model
Students:
Brendan Bristow, industrial & systems engineering
Jeffrey Roetcisoender, industrial & systems engineering
Soravit Rojanasaksothorn, industrial & systems engineering
Prabhjot Singh, industrial & systems engineering
Griffin Thurlby, industrial & systems engineering
Ryan Tsuji, industrial & systems engineering
Kritten Vibhagool, industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

MOD Pizza is one of the fastest growing chain restaurants with over 250 locations in the US and United Kingdom and over 5000 employees. With growth, they have had to develop more sophisticated programs and processes that are scalable to business needs, with a goal to have the right people in the right place at the right time to deliver the MOD experience to all customers. The student team worked to develop a validated working labor and deployment model that MOD Pizza can implement into labor scheduling software, to be used at all MOD Pizza locations and all store formats.

A group of students

MOD Pizza

Reach-in versus Walk-in Refrigeration Assessment

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Reach-in versus Walk-in Refrigeration Assessment
Students:
Mikeala Bourree, industrial & systems engineering
Kelly Hoang, industrial & systems engineering
Alexander Mario, industrial & systems engineering
Christine Na, industrial & systems engineering
Lance Phillips, industrial & systems engineering
Josh Quachindustrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

MOD Pizza is one of the fastest growing chain restaurants with over 250 locations in the US and United Kingdom and over 5000 employees. With growth, they have had to develop more sophisticated programs and processes that are scalable to business needs. Much of the current store designs are driven by the placement of walk-in refrigerator/freezer units, which due to size, limits ability to design the optimal store. The student team worked to deliver a recommendation for refrigerated storage and capacity needs for MOD Pizza locations, and considered the type of equipment needed and delivery frequency of product. The project resulted in a validated business case and recommendation for moving from walk-in refrigeration/freezers to reach-in refrigeration/freezers for all future store locations. The team also developed a tool to determine the number of refrigeration units needed depending on store size and frequency of food deliveries.

A group of students

NanoString

Mobile Digital Spatial Profiling Platform

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Mobile Digital Spatial Profiling Platform
Students:
Armin Rouz, bioengineering
Peter Schultz, bioengineering
Eliot Sosin, bioengineering
Grant Tremel, bioengineering
Faculty Adviser:
Xiaohu Gao, Professor, Department of Bioengineering
Chris Neils, Senior Lecturer, Department of Bioengineering
About the Project:

Nanostring developed the Digital Spatial Profiling (DSP) platform to make high-throughput measurements of local protein and RNA expression levels within heterogeneous tissue samples. In contrast to the sequential analysis of multi-target immunohistochemistry slides, the DSP platform is paired with Nanostring's optical barcoding technology to sample all analytes on a single slide. The existing benchtop instrument includes imaging and fluidic components to capture spatial context down to single cell resolution, while current nCounter® instruments provide the quantification with a multiplexing capacity of up to 800 targets. The student team developed a proof-of-concept mobile phone based DSP platform for lower resolution applications. The smaller platform, simpler procedure, and much lower cost mobile system could greatly increase access to high-plex quantitative analysis of bio-samples for medical and scientific applications.

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PACCAR

Electro-Activated DEF Doser – Phase II

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Electro-Activated DEF Doser – Phase II
Students:
Zhiyan Chen, mechanical engineering
Yueming Liu, mechanical engineering
Jacob Llavore, mechanical engineering
Vedant Maheshwari, mechanical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Alberto Aliseda, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The project aims to establish the efficacy of ammonia production by electrolysis of urea in diesel after-treatment. Ammonia needs to be produced in-situ and injected in the exhaust of diesel engines to reduce NOx formed in the engine before it is released to the atmosphere. The student team set out to combine low temperature thermolysis with electrolysis of urea to facilitate the production of effective concentrations of ammonia in the after-treatment system under “cold start” conditions. To achieve this goal, the student team studied the literature on the chemical processes occurring during thermolysis and electrolysis of urea, selecting a set of equations and kinetic rates to model these processes computationally. Then the team designed, built and tested a laboratory loop mimicking the conditions for electrolysis of urea under moderate temperatures (less than 90 C) and injection into the heated gas exhaust (up to 150 C), recovering liquid/solid DEF and deposits and evaluating the concentration of ammonia in the gas stream.

A group of students

PACCAR

Remote Vehicle Control Human Machine Interface

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Remote Vehicle Control Human Machine Interface
Students:
Meng Cai, mechanical engineering
Hongtao Huang, computer science & engineering
Khrisna Kamarga, mechanical engineering
Yudong Lin, mechanical engineering
Wilson Martinez, mechanical engineering
Xiange Wang, mechanical engineering
Yichao Wang- statistics
Hongliang Wu, mechanical engineering
Mohammad Zamir Mohiddin, mechanical engineering
Yang Zheng, mechanical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Brian Fabien, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The student team worked to develop a concept for efficient, intuitive, accurate and safe human machine interface for remote operation of an unmanned class 8 truck within the PACCAR Technical Center test track environment. Design requirements included accurate lane control and speed management and back office deployment of human override control for driverless vehicles in unusual situations.

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PACCAR

Remote Vehicle Control Wireless Communication

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Remote Vehicle Control Wireless Communication
Students:
Adhinav Jadon, electrical engineering
Walker Kasinadhuni, electrical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Sumit Roy, Integrated Systems Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering
About the Project:

The student team worked to develop wireless software for remote vehicle control of an unmanned class 8 truck within the PACCAR Technical Center track environment. Design requirements included redundant communication channels from vehicle to vehicle, vehicle to infrastructure and infrastructure to vehicle, redundant failsafe link for control of driverless vehicle by a remote operator, data streaming, and two-way communication using a mesh network to maintain communication with moving vehicle and back office. The project resulted in software design and implementation, network architecture within the constraints of the existing modem locations, and demonstration and testing of a high reliability design with redundant communications channels and an optimized network for high data throughput in a mesh layout.

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Sagetech

Angle of Attack Sensor for Small UAS

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Angle of Attack Sensor for Small UAS
Students:
Kylle Ashton, aeronautics and astronautics
Silviu Gruber, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Gregory Sanon, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Adam Bruckner, Professor Emeritus, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

The student team set out to design a method of electronically sensing Angle-of-Attack that is suitable for a medium sized UAS (55-500 pounds). Sensing aircraft Angle-of-Attack is of interest in the field of Unmanned Aerial Systems, specifically at low speeds, for enhancing autonomous landing capability. The team created a feasibility prototype that demonstrates the capability of their designed method.

A group of students

TE Connectivity

Automation Manufacturing Technology Harrisburg Scheduling System

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Project Name:
Automation Manufacturing Technology Harrisburg Scheduling System
Students:
Dillon Gibbs, industrial & systems engineering
Reid Gilbertson, industrial & systems engineering
Randy Hemion, industrial & systems engineering
Junil Kim, industrial & systems engineering
Jessica Kuskanto Putri, industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

The TE Connectivity Automation Manufacturing Technology Group located in Harrisburg, PA requires a scheduling system to be developed for its engineering, shop and contract manufacturing resources. The current system is outdated and given the Group’s projected growth it is critical that a new system be established. The current system utilizes spreadsheets and legacy databases to schedule and track materials, costs and resources. The student team set out to understand the business needs of the group and the current methods, and design a feasible, user-friendly scheduling system to be developed and implemented. This system has the ability to schedule materials and organizational resources, track costs, and provide high level and detailed reporting.

 
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TE Connectivity

Idea Propagation Across Industry

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
Idea Propagation Across Industry
Students:
Michael Kozlowski, industrial & systems engineering
RP McCoy, industrial & systems engineering
West O’Brien, industrial & systems engineering
Brandon Pittaway, industrial & systems engineering
Jared Smith, industrial & systems engineering
John Stewart, industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

TE Connectivity is an electronics and sensors manufacturer that spans across 12 different industries. The student team set out to ideate, design, and implement a system for TE Connectivity to share operational best practices throughout all 90+ plant locations. The system was required to capture data on various plant needs and strengths using a survey-type format, contain a searchable database for accessibility and sharing, and recommended specific practices based on each plant’s data and automatically send an email with this digest of information.

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UW Medical Center Ambulatory Care

Clinic Resource Optimization

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Project Name:
Clinic Resource Optimization
Students:
Nicholas Anderson, industrial & systems engineering
Kyle Briggs, industrial & systems engineering
Chanel Ngo, industrial & systems engineering
Denny Nguyen, industrial & systems engineering
Anushka Wadhawan, industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

Healthcare is a complex and ever evolving industry. One could argue healthcare has one of if not the most opportunity in terms of standardization, reducing variation and optimizing of resources. UW Medical Center is interested in optimization of the complex processes, systems, or organizations found with the operations of the clinic enterprise. The student team set out to look at the three main resources, space, physicians and staff, and identify how best to optimize these variables to eliminate waste of time, money, materials, person-hours, machine time, energy and other resources that do not generate value. They developed a tool to improve the quality and productivity of these finite resources ultimately leading to a better experience for patients, staff and physicians, better use of resources and the most financially viable scenario going forward.

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UW Housing and Food Services

Operationalizing Mobile Ordering

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Project Name:
Operationalizing Mobile Ordering
Students:
Lauren Feldmann, industrial & systems engineering
Dustin Wang, industrial & systems engineering
Randy Wenan, industrial & systems engineering
Shenghua Wu, industrial & systems engineering
Min Yu,industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

UW Dining is introducing mobile ordering via a third party and must operationalize it to coordinate ordering and receiving products in several on-campus venues. The current generation of students have embraced mobile technology as a viable option for purchasing meal and snack options at home and at work. The student team set out to optimize the third party platform to improve throughput, increase sales and check averages, increase guest satisfaction, reduce lines, and adjust point of sale work.

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UW Housing and Food Services

Transportation and Logistics Fleet

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Project Name:
Transportation and Logistics Fleet
Students:
Megan Hoo, industrial & systems engineering
Ben King, industrial & systems engineering
Stephen Lam, industrial & systems engineering
Yifu Liao, industrial & systems engineering
Sean de Zhen Ng, industrial & systems engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Patty Buchanan, Full Time Lecturer, Industrial & Systems Engineering
About the Project:

Bay Laurel Catering, with annual sales volume of $4.0 million, provides off-premise catering services to the campus and beyond (limited), and acts as a central production hub for grab and go products for campus cafés. The department is moving to a new home base with additional capacity in July. As the business is primarily off-premise, transportation is required to be coordinated to about 95% of the events supported. The student team analyzed the current transportations logistics and fleet and modeled scenarios which included a 10% annual growth. The recommendations included type of vehicles necessary and optimal (given volume, type/size of event, geography, and safety) and how these vehicles can the dispatched and coordinated to account for catering, delivery of commissary items, and movement of staff.

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Vulcan Technologies LLC

Poacher Discovery and Tracking from an Aerial Vehicle

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Project Name:
Poacher Discovery and Tracking from an Aerial Vehicle
Students:
Alex Bernard, aeronautics and astronautics
Christopher Lynch, aeronautics and astronautics
Gabriella Sciuchetti, aeronautics and astronautics
Samden Sherpa, UW Bothell, electrical engineering
Faculty Adviser:
Chris Lum, Research Assistant Professor, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
About the Project:

The student team set out to identify techniques and technologies to detect and track poachers in Africa and elsewhere. For example, poachers use cell phones, drive in trucks, and deploy barbed wire to indiscriminately snare roaming animals (spooling and storing this material in large piles when not in use). Discovering these anomalies and forwarding this data in real time to authorities will deny materials and territory to poachers and produce evidence of their activities. The team developed a final system, using aerospace expertise to complete design tradeoffs, determine the difference between expected and delivered performance, fabricate experimental hardware, and create performance test plans.

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