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Industry & Alumni

2019/2020 Mechanical Engineering Industry-Sponsored Student Capstone Projects

Boeing

Fastener Push In vs. Rivet Gun Installation

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Fastener Push In vs. Rivet Gun Installation
Students:
Kurt Smith
Faculty Adviser:
Per Reinhall, Department Chair and Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

The project aims to evaluate the forces required to instal interference fit fasteners using a percussion rivet gun. Currently, forces are measured using an instron and it is not understood how those forces differ from a rivet gun. The project will evaluate forces generated during installation by both a rivet gun and an instron and attempt to correlate the two. The project will initially look at aluminium coupons and titanium fasteners and later on investigate aluminum, carbon fiber bonded coupons.

Boeing

Powder Bed Fusion Build Characterization

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Powder Bed Fusion Build Characterization
Students:
Jordan Hatch
Alexander Hicker
Ryan Van Der Hoeven
Chris Liu
Melody Mojib
Faculty Adviser:
Dwayne Arola, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
Ramulu Mamidala, Boeing-Pennell Endowed Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

Recent advances in titanium powder bed fusion technology offer attractive aerospace design solutions including net shape, the enabling of complicated designs, as well as reduced material waste and overall processing time. However, to offer additive parts as competitive alternatives to those achieved by traditional manufacturing, materials and processes must be optimized. Research and development is needed to understand the influence of key process parameters on material properties. This student team performed research on the reuse of Titanium powder materials in selective laser melting powder bed fusion, driving recommendations for further experimental efforts that will be focused on characterizing the degradation of powder from an alternative vendor when reused over multiple build iterations.

Boeing

Thermoplastic Composite Control Surface Integrated Wing Design/Build

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Thermoplastic Composite Control Surface Integrated Wing Design/Build
Students:
Romain Beaulieu
Sebastian Bristow
Jason Lee
Faculty Adviser:
Vipin Kumar, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

Boeing has a desire to expand the utilization of thermoplastic composites into wing structure for control surfaces due to their perceived advantages in damage resistance and potential for rapid fabrication and assembly processes. The goal of the Thermoplastic Wing Design project is to explore the application of thermoplastics, specifically carbon fiber/PEEK for the manufacturing of a small, high lift surface. The student team designed a non-symmetrical airfoil for Boeing along with aerospace grade internal structures assembled using standard aerospace techniques that can withstand loads in the UW 3x3 wind tunnel. The wing flap spans 34.75 inches with the airfoil geometry of the 2019 UW Formula SAE car. This project explored the various effects of carbon fiber/PEEK stacking, common aerospace internal structures, and thermoplastic welding.

Boeing

Uprights via Ti6Al4V Additive Manufacturing

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Uprights via Ti6Al4V Additive Manufacturing
Students:
Emili Aslett
Justin Lounder
Morgan Meserve
Sarah Monsrud
Derek Repsch
Faculty Adviser:
Ashley Emery, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

Uprights are responsible to rigidly transfer loads from the tires and brake calipers to the chassis and is a safety-critical component to a car. A group of students from the UW Formula Motor Sports Team worked to manufacture these uprights in-house using Additive Manufacturing Electron Beam Melting, widening the students’ knowledge base for 3-D metal printing, and making them a more competitive team. The team worked to reduce the weight, increase the stiffness and design for safety and reliability of the upright.

Latécoère

Additive Manufacturing Bi-Material Rod Spring

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Additive Manufacturing Bi-Material Rod Spring
Students:
Giovany Lopez
Vincent Overney
Harpreet Singh
James Vogel
Faculty Adviser:
Ramulu Mamidala, Boeing-Pennell Endowed Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

Rod springs are widely used in aircraft door mechanisms to secure component and mechanism positions. Conventional manufacturing technologies use spring and a guiding mechanisms, assembled in three parts. The student team worked to manufacture a rod spring in one single element, without assembly, using 3D printing of an elastomer to generate the spring effect and a plastic to generate the guiding function and allow interface with the mechanism.

Novo Nordisk

InsuCon: Insulin Pen Injection Confirmation

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
InsuCon: Insulin Pen Injection Confirmation
Students:
Edwin Antonio
Miles Matsen
Jamal Nurdin
Shayla Payne
Georges Motchoffo Simo
Faculty Adviser:
Jonathan Posner, Richard and Victoria Harrington Professor in Engineering Innovation in Health, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

Approximately 10% of the US population has diabetes, with many more being pre-diabetic. Incorrect administration of insulin (e.g., too little, too much, or at wrong times) can result in transient and serious hypo- and hyperglycemia, wide glycemic excursions, and diabetic ketoacidosis. Special care must be taken to ensure that the correct dose of insulin is administered. There is clearly a need to accurately confirm the dose of insulin injected, thus providing more reliable and accurate treatment. The interdisciplinary student team designed and developed an insulin injection pen that can detect/confirm the insulin was injected into the skin as intended. This solution would accurately confirm the dose of insulin injected, thus providing more reliable and accurate treatment, and preventing costly complications.

PACCAR

Vehicle Platooning

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Vehicle Platooning
Students:
Nathan Hammermaster
Faculty Adviser:
Santosh Devasia, Professor, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

PACCAR is a leader in the development of autonomous vehicles. There is interest in developing vehicle platoons as autonomous vehicles become available to improve vehicle performance and reduce workload of drivers. The student team worked on development and optimization of ordering of a mixed platoon (of heterogeneous vehicles with potentially different vehicle dynamics, sensor availability, and other factors) to improve overall ability to maintain the platoon over different grades.

PACCAR

Warranty Claims Failure Mode Analysis

Sponsor:
Project Name:
Warranty Claims Failure Mode Analysis
Students:
Avani Bajaj
Yuhan Gao
Jundi Liu
Tianhao Xu
Faculty Adviser:
Ashis Banerjee, Assistant Professor, Industrial & Systems Engineering and Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

PACCAR Technical Center Advanced Analytics groups warranty claims into potential product quality projects based on the identified failure modes and corrective steps. The product quality projects are used to improve product design, resolve defects, and increase customer satisfaction. An initial root cause analysis is performed to determine if it is a design, production or supplier quality issue, before the project is assigned to the appropriate teams for resolution. The student team worked to automate classification of warranty claims into failure modes using a machine learning algorithm and develop a dashboard to visualize how (based on what criteria or features) automated classification is being performed as well as whether classification performance is satisfactory or requires improvement.

Stryker

C-O-You: Custom etCO2 Validation

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Sponsor:
Project Name:
C-O-You: Custom etCO2 Validation
Students:
Brian Do
Liban Hussein
Grant LaRocca
Emily Rhodes
Trevor Tran
Faculty Adviser:
Soyoung Kang, Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering
About the Project:

A patient unable to breathe on their own and maintain their airway must be intubated to receive oxygen. End-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) is an important vital sign in pre-hospital and emergency medicine settings as an indicator for a variety of patient conditions, including successful restoration of circulation in CPR, shock and heart failure. Capnography provides a continuous measurement of EtCO2 and constant monitoring of the capnogram is a standard of care in the pre-hospital setting. When the patient is moved, both from the field into an ambulance and from an emergency cot to a hospital bed, the patient, as well as the several connections between the patient and monitor, such as capnography tubing, must be moved together to avoid complications such as the tubing getting pulled out, injury to the patient, or potentially avoidable death. The student team designed and developed a solution to address this need to eliminate wiring of current capnography technology and provide more information to EMTs in the pre-hospital setting.