University of Washington College of Engineering

 

 

 

 

CoE NewsFlash  |  Vol. 3, No. 7  |  October 30, 2009  


NewsFlash: College of Engineering in the Media

NewsFlash is a monthly selection of press items featuring our College's researchers. If you have trouble reading this page in your e-mail program, please read it online. A more complete and regularly updated list of COE media coverage is available on the College Web site, by RSS and on Twitter.

Click on a headline to read that article on the Web. Some links may no longer be active. For that reason, each story is also permanently archived as a PDF document that you can open by clicking on the PDF icon to the left of each item. Or you can read all the stories at once by viewing this bookmarked compilation.

NewsFlash is a service of the UW College of Engineering and the UW Office of News and Information. If you have a newsworthy result about one month from publication, presentation or demonstration, please contact Hannah Hickey at (206-543-2580, hickeyh@uw.edu).

 

Oct. 6, 2009   |  BusinessWeek
A new lab to feed Lamborghini's need for speed



Lamborghini president Stephan Winkelmann is turning to the composites experts at the University of Washington in Seattle to help him get a few more miles per hour into his cars. He came to campus on Oct. 6 to open the new Automobili Lamborghini Advanced Composite Structures Lab, a facility funded largely by the company’s $1 million donation. That’s because Lamborghini believes that improving speed in its cars will come from making them lighter.

SOURCE MATERIAL  
UW's newly named 'Lamborghini Lab' brings composite parts to sports-car arena  |  Oct. 6, 2009

 

 

 

Oct. 9, 2009   |  Bloomberg
Lamborghini courts Sir Mix-A-Lot, balances power with emissions



Supercar makers have a balancing act: They don’t want the status symbols to attract blame as consumers warm to protecting the environment, yet they can’t spoil the high-performance cachet of the cars. Lamborghini is working at UW to develop lightweight composites to reduce the cars' weight.

RELATED MATERIAL  
UW's newly named 'Lamborghini Lab' brings composite parts to sports-car arena  |  Oct. 6, 2009

 

 

 

Oct. 6, 2009   |  SeattlePI.com
What do a Lamborghini and a Boeing 787 have in common?



What do super sports cars and passenger airliners have in common? Increasing use of composites, for one, and, now, sponsorship of composites testing at the University of Washington.

SOURCE MATERIAL  
UW's newly named 'Lamborghini Lab' brings composite parts to sports-car arena  |  Oct. 6, 2009

 

 

 

Oct. 6, 2009   |  KOMO TV
UW helping Lamborghinis become faster, lighter



The sound of a Lamborghini is seductive, and it means big bucks for the University of Washington. The Italian automaker is donating $1 million to the school. And in exchange, UW researchers will help Lamborghinis become lighter, faster and safer.

SOURCE MATERIAL  
UW's newly named 'Lamborghini Lab' brings composite parts to sports-car arena  |  Oct. 6, 2009

 

 

 

Sept. 28, 2009   |  The Seattle Times: Brier Dudley's blog
Intel robot's new trick, wireless music and other research goodies



Seattle Times columnist Brier Dudley writes about Marvin, a one-armed robot built by Intel's Seattle lab affiliated with the University of Washington. The article also mentions electrical engineer Alanson Sample's work on wireless power.

 

 

 

Sept. 28, 2009   |  Puget Sound Business Journal: TechFlash blog
Intel robot 'Marvin' automatically senses outlet, plugs himself in



A demo of Marvin the house robot that was filmed this afternoon at Intel Labs Seattle's annual open house near the University of Washington. The lab works in close collaboration with some UW students and professors.

 

 

 

Sept. 29, 2009   |  Xconomy
Intel Labs Seattle’s new director, Dieter Fox, on why the future of robotics matters to Intel



Xconomy talks with new Intel Labs Seattle director Dieter Fox, a UW associate professor of computer science and engineering, on how robotics will fit into the lab's research on perception and sensing.

 

 

 

Oct. 17, 2009   |  Wired: Geek Dad blog
How secure is your robot?



With more people buying interactive robots, one naturally poses the question, just how secure are these bots? Particularly when you take into consideration bots that connect to the Internet, is there the potential for mischief? Computer scientist Yoshi Kohno and doctoral student Tamara Denning conducted a study where they evaluated three toy robots.

SOURCE MATERIAL  
Household robots do not protect users' security and privacy, researchers say  |  Oct. 8, 2009

 

 

 

Oct. 8, 2009   |  Popular Science
The dangers of rogue household robots



Car keys missing? Your friendly metal servant may have swiped them.

SOURCE MATERIAL  
Household robots do not protect users' security and privacy, researchers say  |  Oct. 8, 2009

 

 

 

Sept. 15, 2009   |  MSNBC (via LiveScience)
Why yes, electricity does grow on trees - sort of



Electrical engineers Brian Otis and Babak Parviz have figured out a way to plug into the power generated by trees.

SOURCE MATERIAL  
Electrical circuit runs entirely off power in trees  |  Sept. 8, 2009

 

 

 

Sept. 30, 2009   |  Economist
Peering into the future



A contact lens developed by electrical engineer Babak Parviz and other UW researchers could put names to faces and guide soldiers in combat.

RELATED MATERIAL  
Contact lenses with circuits, lights a possible platform for superhuman vision  |  Jan. 17, 2008

 

 

 

Oct. 26, 2009   |  San Francisco Chronicle
Augmented reality to alter how we see the world



Imagine for a moment seeing the world through the eyes of a Terminator cyborg. Information on objects, locations and people automatically pop up in real time as you encounter them. Electrical engineer Babak Parviz is working on contact lenses that can be outfitted with circuits and antennas that could serve as augmented reality goggles.

RELATED MATERIAL  
Contact lenses with circuits, lights a possible platform for superhuman vision  |  Jan. 17, 2008

 

 

 

Nov. 1, 2009   |  Fast Company
Augmented reality is both a fad and the future



Layering data on top of smartphones and computer screens is both a fad and the future. Babak Parviz, a bio-nanotechnologist at the UW, has been working on augmented-reality contact lenses that would layer computer graphics on everything around us -- in other words, we'd have Terminator eyes.

RELATED MATERIAL  
Contact lenses with circuits, lights a possible platform for superhuman vision  |  Jan. 17, 2008

 

 

 

Oct. 24, 2009   |  KING 5 TV
UW develops early detection for lung cancer



There still is no early detection screening for lung cancer. As a result, survivor rates remain low. Mechanical engineer Eric Seibel and Gig Harbor-based company VisionGate are developing a cost-effective early screen for lung cancer.

RELATED MATERIAL  
Cancer diagnosis: Now in 3-D  |  Feb. 9, 2009

 

 

 

Sept. 28, 2009   |  Gizmag
Glass casting meets the digital age: 3-D glass printing method developed



Mechanical engineer Mark Ganter and students have revived an ancient Egyptian glass-casting method to develop "Vitraglyphic," a technique to manufacture glass objects from fine glass powder using computer-aided design and a 3-D printer.

SOURCE MATERIAL  
UW lab demonstrates 3-D printing in glass  |  Sept. 24, 2009

 

 

 

Oct. 21, 2009   |  SeattlePI.com (via Xconomy)
Enroute, MicroGreen win Zino prizes



Seattle-based Zino Society has announced the winners of its 2009 Zino Zillionaire Investment Funds. MicroGreen Polymers, a spinout from mechanical engineer Vipin Kumar's lab that makes plastic products more environmentally sustainable, took home $60,000.

 

 

 

Oct. 20, 2009   |  Puget Sound Business Journal: TechFlash blog
Farecast founder schools wannabe entrepreneurs



As part of Foster School of Business’s “From Invention to Startup” lecture series, computer scientist Oren Etzioni, founder of Farecast, shepherded an auditorium full of fledgling entrepreneurs from research to a startup.

RELATED MATERIAL  
Airfare analyzer could save big bucks by advising when to buy tickets  |  April 1, 2003

 

 

 

Oct. 14, 2009   |  Seattlest blog
The transit holy grail: One Bus Away



We certainly commend Seattle Metro for having their own iPhone App. It's a good effort and a step in the right direction, but One Bus Away, created by computer science graduate student Brian Ferris, is better for a number of reasons.

RELATED MATERIAL  
Bus left you waiting in the cold? Use your cell phone to track it down  |  Feb. 10, 2009

 

 

 

Oct. 15, 2009   |  Puget Sound Business Journal: TechFlash blog
TechFlash Live Women in Tech: Introducing our top-notch panel



"TechFlash Live: Women in Tech" will be held on Oct. 28. Panelists include Yoky Matsuoka, associate professor of computer science and engineering, and the winner of a MacArthur Genius Award for her work in neurorobotics.

 

 

 

Oct. 29, 2009   |  Puget Sound Business Journal: TechFlash blog
Video: TechFlash women in tech



A video with highlights from TechFlash's Women in Tech event, which featured computer scientist Yoky Matsuoka.

 

 

 

Oct. 21, 2009   |  CNET
Adobe demos next-gen erase tool in Photoshop



An upcoming Photoshop feature can remove telephone wires or a tree from an image, or clean up stray hairs from an imperfect scan of a print. Adobe developed the technology in collaboration with Princeton University and the University of Washington.

 

 

 

Oct. 28, 2009   |  DOTmed.com
Cancer nanomedicine: Tiny devices make a big difference



Research by materials scientist Miqin Zhang uses nano-predators to paint the brain and poke holes in tumor cells. This and other new developments in nanomedicine will be presented this month at the American Society of Nanomedicine's inaugural conference.

RELATED MATERIAL  
Nanoparticles cross blood-brain barrier to enable 'brain tumor painting'  |  Aug. 3, 2009

 

 

 

Nov. 1, 2009   |  AARP Magazine
Biologics: New miracle drugs



New medicines that target diseased cells, while leaving healthy cells alone, are transforming the way doctors treat cancer, arthritis, and MS. Bioengineer Patrick Stayton comments on drugs that will deliver proteins and enzymes involved in DNA repair directly to the inside of cells, where disease begins.

 

 

 

Oct. 13, 2009   |  The UW Daily
Online degree for hands-on profession



The Daily comments on UW Bothell's new Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) program that will debut this winter. The majority of classes will take place online.

 

 

 

Oct. 13, 2009   |  Xconomy
The stimulus, UW, and Washington state



Computer scientist Ed Lazowska writes about the UW's remarkable performance in securing research funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

 

 

 

Oct. 14, 2009   |  The Associated Press
Kindle lightens textbook load, but flaws remain



Amazon's Kindle e-reading experiment has made back-to-school a little easier on the back. Computer science graduate students Todd Schiller and Franziska Roesner, who are participating in the UW's Kindle DX pilot project, are quoted.

 

 

 

Oct. 26, 2009   |  Xconomy
Five things Nathan Myhrvold taught us about cooking



Nathan Myhrvold was one of at least three tech billionaires to speak at the UW this month. As part of the computer science and engineering department’s Distinguished Lecturer Series, Myhrvold’s talk covered everything from food safety myths to computer simulations of heat intensity above a barbecue grill.

 

 

 

Oct. 2, 2009   |  Xconomy
Charles Simonyi, software giant turned space tourist, talks technology and exploration at UW



Charles Simonyi, the father of Microsoft Word and Excel, and now head of Bellevue-based Intentional Software, regaled the crowd of a couple hundred UW students, faculty, and guests with stories and videos from his second trip to space last March.

 

 

If you have a newsworthy result about one month from publication, presentation or demonstration, please contact Hannah Hickey, hickeyh@uw.edu. Notice of student and faculty awards and grants is also welcome.

 

 

 

Digital Michaelangelo  microbes in rocks   Tiny pumps for cooling chips     Surgical robot

   

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