NewsFlash is a monthly email of press items featuring our College's researchers. For a more complete and regularly updated list of COE media coverage, see In the Media.

Click on a headline to read that article on the web. Some links may require a subscription or no longer be active.

NewsFlash is a service of the UW College of Engineering and the UW Office of News and Information. If you have a newsworthy result about one month from publication, presentation or demonstration, please contact Michelle Ma at mcma@uw.edu@uw.edu or (206) 543-2580.

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NewsFlash, March 2012

 

Mar. 13, 2012 | MSNBC: Future of Tech blog
Road paved with toilets gets green credential

Poticrete pavement   A newly paved six-block stretch of Bellingham contains 5 tons of crushed toilets. The project is the first to earn certification from Greenroads, a sustainability rating system developed by civil engineer Steve Muench and civil engineering PhD student Jeralee Anderson.

RELATED MATERIAL
Bellingham roadway with recycled toilets is world's first official 'Greenroad' | Mar. 12, 2012

 

Mar. 13, 2012 | KING 5
Pulverized potties used in Bellingham sidewalk

Closeup of poticrete sign   KING 5 visits Bellingham to report on the sustainable road project honored by the UW-created Greenroads Foundation.

RELATED MATERIAL
Bellingham roadway with recycled toilets is world's first official 'Greenroad' | Mar. 12, 2012

 

Mar. 12, 2012 | LiveScience.com
Old toilets put city on Greenroads path

A Bellingham project is the first to earn certification from Greenroads, an independent rating system developed by UW civil and environmental engineers. It aims to promote sustainable roadway construction, similar to LEED certification for buildings.

RELATED MATERIAL
Bellingham roadway with recycled toilets is world's first official 'Greenroad' | Mar. 12, 2012

 

Mar. 03, 2012 | The Economist
An open-source robo-surgeon

Raven wielding scalpel   A new, open-source medical robot developed by electrical engineer Blake Hannaford promises to make surgery safer and more effective, and stimulate further innovation in the field.

RELATED MATERIAL
Surgical robots to provide open-source platform for medical robotics research | Jan. 12, 2012

 

Mar. 07, 2012 | New Scientist (subscription required)
Exotic electrical effect pops up in soft mammalian tissue

Person radiating electric fields   An electrical phenomenon called ferroelectricity, used in computer memories, has popped up in the soft tissue of mammals. The discovery by mechanical engineer Jiangyu Li raises the possibility of "electrician" drugs that switch off cholesterol's ability to stick to arteries and, perhaps in the far future, bio-friendly memory for storing programs to run tiny implanted devices.

RELATED MATERIAL
Ferroelectric switching discovered for first time in soft biological tissue | Jan. 30, 2012

 

Mar. 05, 2012 | Nature Nanotechnology (subscription required)
Ferroelectrics comes alive

Research image   In a research highlight, Nature Nanotechnology describes how mechanical engineer Jiangyu Li and colleagues have shown that mammalian tissue can be both piezoelectric and ferroelectric.

RELATED MATERIAL
Ferroelectric switching discovered for first time in soft biological tissue | Jan. 30, 2012

 

Mar. 01, 2012 | The (UW) Daily
UW scientists study quantum dots to find cures for diseases

The future of cell manipulation is right here at the UW. Electrical engineer Lih Lin and UW physiologist Fred Rieke can stimulate neurons in the brain by using quantum dots.

 

Mar. 04, 2012 | USA Today: College
Five ways to avoid the pitfalls of technology in college

Pens and pencils   A USA Today columnist offers tips on how to avoid the pitfalls of education in the digital age. Number 5, "the power of paper," cites human-centered design and engineering Charlotte Lee's research on the use of e-readers for academic work.

RELATED MATERIAL
College students’ use of Kindle DX points to e-reader’s role in academia | May. 02, 2011

 

Mar. 14, 2012 | KUOW: Weekday
Greener computers?

KUOW's Weekday talks with new Facebook fellow Adrian Sampson, a PhD student in computer science and engineering, about "greener" software that would make computers more efficient (at 21:30).

RELATED MATERIAL
Code green: Energy-efficient programming to curb computers’ power use | May. 31, 2011

 

Mar. 20, 2012 | The New York Times
In search for alien life, researchers enlist human minds

Radio telescopes   With new Web-based software called SETILive, an army of independent citizen-scientists are being enlisted to help with the hunt for unusual signals. Projects in other fields have already proved the power of relatively untrained human participants. For example, Foldit, a project of UW biochemists and computer scientists, developed a Web-based video game that treated protein-folding as a puzzle.

RELATED MATERIAL
Paper uncovers power of Foldit gamers’ strategies | Nov. 07, 2011
Gaming for a cure: Computer gamers tackle protein folding | Aug. 04, 2010

 

Feb. 27, 2012 | Slate: Future Tense blog
The crowdsourcing of talent

Woman's hands typing   Scientists are using video games to make major breakthroughs. Are they revolutionizing how we manage labor at the same time? The UW's Foldit project is mentioned.

RELATED MATERIAL
Paper uncovers power of Foldit gamers’ strategies | Nov. 07, 2011
Gaming for a cure: Computer gamers tackle protein folding | Aug. 04, 2010

 

Mar. 08, 2012 | The (UW) Daily
New ventures facility launches UW-based businesses

The New Ventures Facility provides UW-based startup companies with office and lab space. Electrical engineer Vikram Jandhyala is quoted.

RELATED MATERIAL
UW launches technology startup incubator, aims to double startups in three years | Feb. 08, 2012

 

Mar. 02, 2012 | Puget Sound Business Journal (subscription required)
Unlocking the lab and launching companies

Computer scientist and electrical engineer Shwetak Patel wants to sniff the air in your home and warn you if there’s lead or mold. Mechanical engineering graduate Brian Glaister's company, Cadence Biomedical, wants to help people be able to walk. Both are realizing their ideas with support from the UW's Center for Commercialization.

 

Mar. 02, 2012 | Puget Sound Business Journal (subscription required)
An inside look at software being made

Vixim co-founder and CEO Steve Cathcart (left) and co-founder and Chairman Vikram Jandhyala   To get a sense of what it means to take an idea and commercialize it, Puget Sound Business Journal talks with electrical engineer Vikram Jandhyala about the process of creating a software company, Vlxim, with help from the UW's C4C.

 

Mar. 02, 2012 | Puget Sound Business Journal (subscription required)
When scholarship and secrecy collide

Shwetak Patel holding iPad showing data from a Hydrosense sensor   As UW pushes its professors to get more involved with commercialization, many are steering right into the conflict between science and secrecy. Despite some challenges, electrical engineer and computer scientist Shwetak Patel thinks that UW is improving in how it helps professors sort through myriad rules on intellectual property, licensing and commercialization of inventions.

 

Mar. 02, 2012 | CNN
Could hackers seize control of your car?

A student at the Freie Universitaet Berlin steers a converted Dodge minivan remotely with an iPhone in November 2009.   While Ford's unveiling of its latest car at Mobile World Congress this week may herald a new automotive age, it also heightens fears that cars could be hijacked by hackers. Last year, computer scientists at the UW and UCSD reported they were able to gain remote access to the safety systems of a "moderately priced sedan" using an audio CD infected with a virus.

RELATED MATERIAL
Media alert: Presentation on the security of modern automobiles | May. 18, 2010

 

Mar. 05, 2012 | The Seattle Times: Brier Dudley's blog
Photos: Lamborghini Aventador J, the Mach 6?

Lamborghini Aventador J   Lamborghini today announced the latest showcase of the carbon-fiber materials research it's doing with aeronautical engineer Paolo Feraboli in the UW's Lamborghini Lab.

RELATED MATERIAL
UW's newly named 'Lamborghini Lab' brings composite parts to sports-car arena | Oct. 06, 2009

 

Mar. 13, 2012 | The Seattle Times
Picture this: Lamborghini's low-flying Dreamliner

Back view of the Aventador LP 700-4.   The Aventador uses materials such as carbon fiber, similar to what is used in the 787 Dreamliner, that were developed at the UW's advanced composite structures lab. See a photo gallery of the "Boeing edition" Aventador, painted in the Dreamliner colors and displayed a recent Seattle aerospace trade show.

RELATED MATERIAL
UW's newly named 'Lamborghini Lab' brings composite parts to sports-car arena | Oct. 06, 2009

 

Mar. 08, 2012 | KIRO TV
Northern Lights on tap for Western Washington sky-watchers?

Northern Lights   Solar winds blasted the earth Thursday, pushing the Northern Lights far enough south to make them possibly visible in or near Seattle. Electrical engineer John Sahr explains the phenomenon and its possible effects.

 

Mar. 08, 2012 | The (UW) Daily
A costly trend: UW considers changing the price of attendance for select majors

Graphic of tuition changes at the UW   Students in selected majors could see an increase in the cost of attendance if the UW follows the nationwide trend of differential tuition. Differential tuition is essential for the UW College of Engineering to maintain the quality of its program, says Dean Matt O’Donnell.

 

Mar. 18, 2012 | The Seattle Times
Delay likely for proposal to allow higher fees for costlier degrees

State lawmakers are likely going to postpone plans to charge engineering and chemistry majors higher tuition than history and English majors.Discussions center on how to preserve Guaranteed Education Tuition credits under the new fee structure.

 

Mar. 28, 2012 | The Seattle Times
New scholarship aims to fan interest in high-tech careers

A new public-private scholarship for Washington college students who are studying in high-tech fields will award 3,000 scholarships of $1,000 each.

 

Jan. 01, 2012 | IEEE Pulse (subscription required)
Yongmin Kim: Setting the pace for bioengineers

Yongmin Kim   After almost 30 years at the UW, rather than retiring, former bioengineering chair Yongmin Kim accepted a position as president of South Korea's Pohang University of Science and Technology. Bioengineering professor and Dean Matt O'Donnell, and bioengineering professor Lee Huntsman, are quoted.

RELATED MATERIAL
Bioengineering's Yongmin Kim selected to lead South Korean institution | Aug. 17, 2011

 

If you have a newsworthy result about one month from publication, presentation or demonstration, through the end of 2011 please contact Hannah Hickey. Notice of student and faculty awards and grants is also welcome.