News & Events

News

February 21, 2017 | UW Today
Ali Farhadi, assistant professor of computer science and engineering, it one of three faculty members at the University of Washington to be awarded early-career fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The fellowships honor early-career scholars whose achievements mark them as the next generation of scientific leaders, and each fellow receives $60,000 to apply toward research endeavors.
February 16, 2017 | UW Today
The second Computer Science & Engineering building has received another major boost in the form of a $5 million gift from Charles & Lisa Simonyi. This gift will fund the Charles & Lisa Simonyi Undergraduate Commons, which will act as a “home away from home” for undergraduate students.
February 13, 2017 | College of Engineering
College of Engineering spoke with alumna Susie Lu about how her unique double-major in Painting and Industrial & Systems Engineering set her on a career path to data visualization.
February 10, 2017 | UW Today

The Washington STate Academic RedShirt (STARS) program, which offers engineering students from economically or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds extra academic support, will receive a one-time grant of $2.2 million from the Opportunity Expansion Fund passed by the Washington Legislature and funded by Microsoft.

The 3-year grant is expected to significantly increase the number of students the program can serve during that time period. The expanded STARS initiative will offer supplemental instruction in the math, chemistry and physics courses that are part of the standard engineering curriculum, as well as culturally-aware advising, professional development and career services.

Related: Led by Microsoft's Brad Smith, program gives out $6M in STEM grants in Washington (Puget Sound Business Journal) | Tech, science programs at 3 Washington universities win grants (Seattle Times)

February 10, 2017 | UW Today
A unique application of a medical camera developed by a University of Washington mechanical engineer could one day help physicians know who is at risk for a cardiovascular event by providing a better view of potential problem areas.
February 6, 2017 | College of Engineering
Bioengineering graduate student Nuttada Panpradist is developing an instrument-free diagnostic device to detect HIV infection and drug resistance. The device will allow blood samples to be tested onsite, instead of being sent to a lab for processing, and will yield near-immediate results, thus making it easier to test for HIV in developing countries.
February 1, 2017 | Department of Electrical Engineering
EE alum Henry Louie founded KiloWatts for Humanity to tackle energy poverty in places like Zambia, where less than three percent of rural residents have electricity. KiloWatts for Humanity has established solar- and wind-powered energy kiosks to provide electricity to communities that are not connected to the national grid.
February 1, 2017 | UW Today

AccessMap – a project spearheaded by the CSE-based Taskar Center for Accessible Technology – provides customized directions for Seattle pedestrians and wheelchair users looking to avoid hills, construction sites and other accessibility barriers. The online travel planner offers customizable suggestions for people who need accessible or pedestrian-friendly routes when getting from point A to B in Seattle.

January 25, 2017 | Daily UW
The UW Hyperloop team makes it easy to believe that the Hyperloop is a straight shot to the future. A conceptual idea first proposed by Elon Musk in 2013, the Hyperloop uses a series of tubes to transport high-speed pods in an attempt to revolutionize transportation.
January 24, 2017 | Electrical Engineering News
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics Arka Majumdar, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Physics Xiaodong Xu and their team have discovered an important first step towards building electrically pumped nanolasers (or light-based sources). These lasers are critical in the development of integrated photonic based short-distance optical interconnects and sensors.
January 12, 2017 | UW Today
LATTICE is a new national program that aims to diversify the engineering faculty population by building supportive communities during the critical transition from graduate studies to permanent tenure-track positions. Eve Riskin, associate dean of diversity and access for the College of Engineering, is co-principal investigator of LATTICE, which stands for Launching Academics on the Tenure-Track: An Intentional Community in Engineering.
January 11, 2017 | UW Today
Emily Fox, associate professor of statistics and adjunct associate professor of computer science and engineering and electrical engineering, was one of two UW recipients of the 2017 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor given by the U.S. government to early career scientists and engineers. Fox was nominated by the National Science Foundation “for her groundbreaking work in large-scale Bayesian modeling and computational approaches to time series and longitudinal data analysis, and for outstanding research and mentoring of women in computer science and statistics.”
January 10, 2017 | UW Today
Zillow Group committed $5 million toward the development of a second Computer Science & Engineering (CSE) building. The 130,000-square foot, state-of-the-art facility will allow the university to double the number of CSE degrees it awards each year and reduce the number of qualified students who are turned away from the program. One of the building’s highlights will be the “Zillow Commons,” a 3,000-square-foot event and multiuse space to be used by students, faculty and the community.
January 10, 2017 | Department of Mechanical Engineering
First in her family to attend college, senior Fethya Ibrahim is making the most of her time at the UW. Learn about why — thanks to her experiences in ME’s Cell Biomechanics Lab and in the Machine Shop — she decided to pursue a degree in ME.
December 19, 2016 | UW Today

Miqin Zhang, a professor in UW MSE, is looking for ways to help the body heal itself when injury, disease or surgery cause large-scale damage to one type of tissue in particular: skeletal muscle. Muscles have a limited ability to regenerate, repair and realign themselves properly after certain types of damage.

Zhang and her team are taking a synthetic approach to muscle regeneration. Their goal is to create a synthetic, porous, biologically compatible "scaffold" that mimics the normal extracellular environment of skeletal muscle &mdash' onto which human cells could migrate and grow new replacement fibers.

December 7, 2016 | UW Today
The Taskar Center for Accessible Technology is hosting the TCAT Hack for Access: Holiday Toy event at the CoMotion MakerSpace on Dec. 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Volunteers will adapt toys to make them accessible for children with disabilities. Many off-the-shelf toys have difficult-to-access buttons or inputs that can be replaced with switches that are easier to operate. The event is an opportunity for community members to learn about the adaptive needs of people with disabilities, and to gain hands-on experience in toy adaptation.
December 6, 2016 | UW Today
The U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded approximately $14 million over five years to a multi-university, regional transportation center led by the University of Washington to fund research aimed at improving the mobility of people and goods across the Pacific Northwest.
December 5, 2016 | UW Today
Test subjects in a UW experiment navigated simple mazes based solely on inputs delivered to their brains by a magnetic coil placed at the back of the skull, showing how humans can interact with virtual realities via direct brain stimulation.
November 30, 2016 | UW Today
University of Washington researchers have released a classical music dataset called MusicNet. MusicNet is the first publicly available large-scale classical music dataset with curated fine-level annotations. It’s designed to allow machine learning researchers and algorithms to tackle a wide range of open challenges — from note prediction to automated music transcription to offering listening recommendations based on the structure of a song a person likes.
November 29, 2016 | UW Today
MSE professor Miqin Zhang leads research on a new system to encase chemotherapy drugs within tiny, synthetic “nanocarrier” packages, which could be injected into patients and disassembled at the tumor site to release their toxic cargo. “Our nanocarrier system is really a hybrid addressing two needs — drug delivery and tumor imaging,” said Zhang, senior author on a paper published Sept. 27 in the journal Small. “First, this nanocarrier can deliver chemotherapy drugs and release them in the tumor area, which spares healthy tissue from toxic side effects. Second, we load the nanocarrier with materials to help doctors visualize the tumor, either using a microscope or by MRI scan.”
November 22, 2016 | UW Today
UW engineers have developed transgenic grass species that can eliminate RDX, a toxic compound widely used in explosives that contaminates military bases, battlegrounds and some drinking water wells.
November 3, 2016 | UW Today
In the last decade, the signal-processing technique of compressed sensing has delivered notable speedups in medical imaging, from pediatric MRI to dynamic cardiac imaging. As part of the 2016 Lytle Lecture Series, Professor David Donoho discussed how we can bridge the gap between compressed sensing theory and practice.
October 26, 2016 | UW Today
A two-way communication loop is necessary to restore movement for people with spinal cord injuries. The brain must be able to send signals to disconnected nerves and muscles, and it also must be able to receive feedback from these nerves. Researchers at the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE) have used direct stimulation of the human brain surface to provide basic sensory feedback through artificial electrical signals, enabling a patient to control movement while performing a simple task: opening and closing his hand.
October 24, 2016 | UW Today
A flat-screen panel that resembles a TV on your living room wall could one day remotely charge any device within its line of sight, according to new research.
October 24, 2016 | UW Today
An IV drip technology developed by Shift Labs, founded by University of Washington Human Centered Design and Engineering Professor Beth Kolko, has been recognized by Popular Science with a 2016 “Best of What’s New” Award. The magazine recognized the company’s DripAssist Infusion Rate Monitor, a simple, compact device that clips to any IV drip to monitor the rate at which medication or fluids are delivered.

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