News & Events

Upcoming Calendar Events

  • Sep 30: Women in Science & Engr. fall kickoff

    Fri Sep 30, 2016 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm | Friday, Sep 30, 2016, 4 - 5:30 p.m. PDT New to UW? Interested in pursuing a STEM field? Want to meet other women on the same journey? Come to our 2016 Fall Welcome! WiSE, SWE & Phi Sigma Rho are teaming up to welcome you to UW and we would love to see all the new students there. Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: South Ballroom Event types: Information Sessions More info: bit.do…

  • Oct 1: UW Engineering Career Success Conference

    Sat Oct 1, 2016 9:30 am - 2:00 pm | Saturday, Oct 1, 2016, 9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. PDT $20 per person; attendance limited to 100 attendees Campus location: Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Event types: Conferences, Information Sessions, Meetings, Student Activities, Workshops Twitter: @UWCCatE

  • Oct 3: Deadline: MSE Industry Day registration

    Mon Oct 3, 2016 12:00 am | Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 Showcase of MSE graduate students’ cutting-edge research. Register by October 3, 2016 Oral presentations and posters will cover a wide range of topics including clean energy generation and storage, biomaterials, semiconductors, and composites. Who should attend? UW students, faculty, industry representatives, and MSE alumni are welcome. We hope you will help us make this inaugural event a success to create a long-lasting tradition! Event types: Academics, Conferences, Exhibits, Information Sessions, Meetings, Student Activities Event sponsors: University of Washington Department of Materials Science & Engineering More info: www.mse.washington.edu…

  • Oct 3: Deadline: MSE Industry Day registration

    Mon Oct 3, 2016 12:00 am | Monday, Oct 3, 2016 Showcase of MSE graduate students’ cutting-edge research. Register by October 3, 2016 Oral presentations and posters will cover a wide range of topics including clean energy generation and storage, biomaterials, semiconductors, and composites. Who should attend? UW students, faculty, industry representatives, and MSE alumni are welcome. We hope you will help us make this inaugural event a success to create a long-lasting tradition! Event types: Academics, Conferences, Exhibits, Information Sessions, Meetings, Student Activities Event sponsors: University of Washington Department of Materials Science & Engineering More info: www.mse.washington.edu…

  • Oct 4: GeekWire Summit

    Tue Oct 4, 2016 12:00 am | Seattle Sheraton, 1400 6th Ave, Seattle, WA 98101 Tuesday, Oct 4 - Wednesday, Oct 5, 2016 The GeekWire Summit in Seattle, is one of the country’s premier technology conferences, bringing together more than 800 innovators, entrepreneurs, business executives and tech leaders to explore the future of the innovation economy. An immersive two-day conference, the Summit features on-stage Q&As, insightful talks, fun cocktail parties and interactive product demos by leaders in tech, science and business. Among other noteworthy speakers is Vikram Jandhyala, the UW VP for Innovation Strategy, Executive Director of CoMotion, UW’s collaborative innovation hub, and the UW co-CEO of the Global Innovation Exchange (GIX). He is a Professor and former Chair in the Department of Electrical Engineering, and an Adjunct Professor in the Information School. Event types: Conferences, Exhibits, Information Sessions, Lectures/Seminars, Meetings, Special Events More info: www.geekwire.com…

  • Oct 4: MolES Seminar: Andrew Ferguson, U of Illinois

    Tue Oct 4, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Oct 4, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PDT Statistical learning of viral fitness landscapes and protein folding funnels The coupling of “big computing” – petascale systems and the multicore paradigm – with “big biology” – high-throughput sequencing and high-resolution molecular measurements – present new opportunities for data driven modeling of biological systems. In the first part of this talk, I will discuss the translation of clinical sequence databases into quantitative models of viral fitness based on spin glass models from statistical physics. In an application to hepatitis C virus, we identified particular viral vulnerabilities and rationally designed T-cell vaccines to hit the virus where is hurts. In the second part of this talk, I will describe an approach integrating ideas from dynamical systems theory and nonlinear machine learning to infer multidimensional biomolecular folding funnels from time series of a single experimentally measurable observable. Bio Andrew Ferguson is Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and an Affiliated Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Computational Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received an M.Eng. in Chemical Engineering from Imperial College London in 2005, and a Ph.D. in Chemical and Biological Engineering from Princeton University in 2010. From 2010 to 2012 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard in the Department of Chemical Engineering at MIT. He commenced his appointment at Illinois in August 2012. His research interests lie at the intersection of materials science, molecular simulation, and machine learning, with particular foci in the design of antiviral vaccines and self-assembling colloids and peptides. He is the recipient of a 2015 ACS OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award, a 2014 NSF CAREER Award, a 2014 ACS PRF Doctoral New Investigator, and was named the Institution of Chemical Engineers North America 2013 Young Chemical Engineer of the Year. Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: ferguson.matse.illinois.edu…

  • Oct 5: Handling Data 101

    Wed Oct 5, 2016 9:00 am - 11:00 am | Wednesday, Oct 5, 2016, 9 - 11 a.m. PDT In 2 hours, learn how to begin taking control of your data and analyses to quickly answer business questions and make decisions. By gaining beginner pivot table skills, you'll see how hundreds or thousands of pieces of information swing into place, revealing the meanings behind the data. Target Audience: Staff & faculty interested in learning basic pivot table skills to enhance one's ability to work with data. Prerequisites: Basic familiarity with Excel Cost: Free Workshop Objectives See how slicing and dicing data using pivot tables is useful Create a pivot table using: generic data EDW cube data downloaded EDW report data NOTE: The focus of this workshop is learning beginner pivot table skills. While we use EDW report and cube data in some of our exercises, this workshop does not address using EDW data to answer specific business questions. Campus location: Roosevelt Commons (RVC) Campus room: Roosevelt Commons, Room 110 4311 11th Ave NE, Seattle Event types: Workshops Event sponsors: UW-IT Enterprise Data & Analytics, Contact: eda-training@uw.edu More info: itconnect.uw.edu…

  • Oct 5: HCDE Seminar: Designing for Tangible and Gesture Interaction

    Wed Oct 5, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Oct 5, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PDT Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. Interactive technology is increasingly integrated with physical objects that do not have a traditional keyboard and mouse style of interaction, and many do not even have a display. These objects require new approaches to interaction design, referred to as post-WIMP (Windows, Icons, Menus, and Pointer) or as embodied interaction design. This presentation provides an overview of the design opportunities, issues, and methodologies associated with two embodied interaction modalities that allow us to leave the traditional keyboard behind: tangible and gesture interaction. This presentation is an overview of a book manuscript in which we explore the issues in designing for this new age of interaction through specific design examples: a reconceptualization of the traditional keyboard as a Tangible Keyboard, the design of interactive 3D models as Tangible Models, the design of gesture-based commands for a Walk-up-and-use Information Display, and the design of a gesture-based dialogue for the willful marionette. About Mary Lou Maher Dr. Mary Lou Maher, most recently a Senior Research Scientist in the iSchool at the University of Maryland and Honorary Professor of Design Computing in the Design Lab at the University of Sydney, is joining the College of Computing and Informatics as the Chair of the Department of Software and Information Systems. Mary Lou completed a BSc at Columbia University in 1979, and a MS and Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon University, completing the Ph.D. in 1984. As the Professor of Design Computing at the University of Sydney she was co-Director of the Key Centre of Design Computing and she established a new degree program: the Bachelor of Design Computing. While at the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 2006-2010, she was Deputy Director of the Information and Intelligent Systems Division and a Program Director. At NSF, she established the CreativeIT program and helped manage the Human Centered Computing, Cyber-Enabled Discovery and Innovation, Design Science, and Social-Computational Systems Programs. While at the University of Maryland, she developed collaborative projects on crowdsourcing design for citizen science and introduced design thinking to graduate projects in information management. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Oct 5: HCDE Info Session: MS in User-Centered Design

    Wed Oct 5, 2016 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm | Wednesday, Oct 5, 2016, 6 - 7 p.m. PDT Join HCDE's academic advisors for an overview of the HCDE Master's program - including curriculum, application process, tuition costs and financing, and potential career paths for Human Centered Design & Engineering graduates. Bring your questions and join us! Campus location: Sieg Hall (SIG) Campus room: 232 Event types: Information Sessions Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Oct 6: Brain-machine interfaces: basic science to clinical trials

    Thu Oct 6, 2016 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm | Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering1414 NE 42nd St., Suite 204Seattle, WA 98105 Thursday, Oct 6, 2016, 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. PDT This Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering/Kavli Foundation seminar features a talk by Krishna Shenoy, PhD. Dr. Shenoy is a professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering and Neurobiology at Stanford University and is an Investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. web.stanford.edu… Summary: Millions of people worldwide suffer from neurological disease and injury leading to paralysis, which is often so severe that people are unable to feed themselves or communicate. Cortically-controlled brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to restore some of this lost function by converting neural activity from the brain into control signals for prosthetic devices. Dr. Shenoy will describe some of his group’s recent investigations into basic motor neurophysiology focused on understanding neural population dynamics, pre-clinical BMIs focused on high-performance control algorithm design, and translational BMI development and pilot clinical trial results focused on helping establish clinical viability. Event types: Lectures/Seminars

  • Oct 6: Clean Energy Inst. Seminar: Michael Chertkov, Los Alamos Natl. Lab.

    Thu Oct 6, 2016 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Oct 6, 2016, 4 - 5 p.m. PDT Pressure Transients and Fluctuations in Natural Gas Networks caused by Gas-Electric Coupling Natural gas-fired generators are often used to balance the fluctuating output of wind generation within electric power transmission systems.  However, the time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas burn rates that impact the pressure in interstate transmission pipelines.  Fluctuating pressure impacts the reliability of natural gas deliveries to those same generators and the safety of pipeline operations. Motivated by this new emerging significance of the gas-grid coupling I start the talk reviewing gas-dynamic models of natural gas pipelines and describe how to utilize this modeling to explore the effects of intermittent wind generation on the fluctuations of pressure and transients in natural gas pipelines. I will also discuss significance, use and peculiarities of the gas-dynamics modelings and simulations in gas-grid stochastic optimization and control problems. Bio: Dr. Chertkov's areas of interest include statistical and mathematical physics applied to energy and communication networks, machine learning, control theory, information theory, computer science, fluid mechanics and optics. Dr. Chertkov received his Ph.D. in physics from the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1996, and his M.Sc. in physics from Novosibirsk State University in 1990.  After his Ph.D., Dr. Chertkov spent three years at Princeton University as a R.H. Dicke Fellow in the Department of Physics.  He joined Los Alamos National Lab in 1999, initially as a J.R. Oppenheimer Fellow in the Theoretical Division.  He is now a technical staff member in the same division. Dr. Chertkov has published more than 150 papers in these research areas.  He is an editor of the Journal of Statistical Mechanics (JSTAT), associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems, member of the Editorial Board of Scientific Reports (Nature Group), a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and a senior member of IEEE. Campus room: BAG 154 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Clean Energy Institute

  • Oct 11: MolES Seminar: Lan Yang, Washington U

    Tue Oct 11, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Oct 11, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PDT Whispering-gallery-mode resonators and their applications for nanoscale sensing Optical sensors based on Whispering-Gallery-Mode (WGM) resonators have emerged as front-runners for label-free, ultra-sensitive detection of nanoscale materials and structures due to their superior capability to significantly enhance the interactions of light with the sensing targets. A WGM resonator traps light in circular orbits in a way similar to a whisper, i.e., a sound wave, traveling along a circular wall, an effect found in the whispering gallery of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. The basis for resonator sensors is that the physical associations and interactions of nanomaterials on the surface of a high-Q optical WGM resonator alter the trajectory and lifetime of photons in a way that can be measured and quantified. In this talk, after briefly introducing the physical concepts of WGM microresonators and their coupling with a microfiber waveguide, I will discuss ultra-high-Q microresonators and microlasers for ultra-sensitive self-referencing detection and sizing of single virion, dielectric and metallic nanoparticles. These recent advancements in WGM microresonators will enable a new class of ultra-sensitive and low-power sensors for investigating the properties and kinetic behaviors of nanomaterials, nanostructures, and nanoscale phenomena. Afterwards, I will discuss our recent exploration of fundamental physics, such as parity-time symmetry and light-matter interactions around exceptional point (EP), in high-quality WGM resonators, which can be used to achieve a new generation of optical systems enabling unconventional control of light flow, such as nonreciprocal light transmission and directional lasing. Similar physics can be used to enhance sensing applications. In the end, I will present a new generic and hand-held microresonator platform that was transformed from a table-top setup, which will help release the power of high-Q WGM resonator technologies for sensing applications. Speaker Bio: Professor Lan Yang is the Edwin H. and Florence G. Skinner professor in the Preston M. Green Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. She received the Ph.D. in applied physics from Caltech in 2005. Her research interests focus on the fundamental understanding of high-quality photonic resonators and their applications for sensing, light harvesting, and communications. She received NSF CAREER Award in 2010 for her work on single nanoparticle detection and sizing using an on-chip optical resonator. She is also the recipient of the 2010 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: www.ese.wustl.edu…

  • Oct 11: Book Release Party: "My Roommate is a Lamp," an HCDE Comics Book

    Tue Oct 11, 2016 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm | Tuesday, Oct 11, 2016, 4 - 6 p.m. PDT Please join the department of Human Centered Design & Engineering to celebrate the latest comic book published by the HCDE Comics Directed Research Group, My Roommate is a Lamp. Through the research group co-led by Professor David Ribes and Seattle-based comic artist Jeremy Kayes, students examined the concept of 'sociotechnical systems' by creating comic-based narratives. My Roommate is a Lamp represents the result of the students' explorations. Come meet the artists, pick up a copy of the book, and try your hand at creating your own comic. Refreshments will be served. Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: 334 Event types: Special Events Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu

  • Oct 12: HCDE Seminar: Heteromation and Other Stories of Computing and Capitalism

    Wed Oct 12, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Oct 12, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PDT Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. Although things seem to be getting ever more automated, in fact, labor is still the cornerstone of capitalism. In this talk I discuss “heteromation” — cheap or free labor extracted through our everyday computing activities such as social media, gaming, reviewing, citizen science, and services like Amazon Mechanical Turk. Computing technologies do not just save labor, they create labor. Heteromation is a new logic of accumulation, one that has enabled capital to continue its necessary growth. I discuss some of the social implications of heteromation, considering its dark side but also its positive potential for reshaping society. About Bonnie Nardi Dr. Bonnie Nardi's research interests include theory in human-computer interaction and computer-supported collaborative work; computer-mediated communication technologies; and studies of social life on the Internet. She specializes in the use of ethnographic methods to study technology. Her theoretical orientation is activity theory. She is author of numerous scientific articles and books. With Tom Boellstorff, Celia Pearce and T.L. Taylor, she is writing a book, Ethnography and Virtual Worlds: A Handbook of Method (Princeton University Press). Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Oct 12: Engineering Lecture: Engineering Solutions for a Sesimically Resilient Seattle

    Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm | Wednesday, Oct 12, 2016, 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. PDT Registration Required Free and open to the public The Pacific Northwest remains unprepared for a major earthquake relative to California, due to infrequency and faults that are not as well understood. Seattle seismic hazard is unique, which requires innovation, research and planning to prepare for "the big one." To ensure the safety of the city, engineers at the University of Washington are developing novel solutions to improve the resilience of buildings, bridges and other structures. Learn about the seismic hazards of the region, examine structural engineering technologies that enable faster and stronger post-event repair, and understand the risks and requirements involved. Speaker: Jeffrey Berman, Thomas & Marilyn Nielsen Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering Part of the City Smarts: Engineering Resilient Communities lecture series More information and registration available in early September. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 130 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: College of Engineering, UW Alumni Association

  • Oct 13: Clean Energy Inst. Seminar: Benjamin F. Hobbs, Johns Hopkins

    Thu Oct 13, 2016 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Oct 13, 2016, 4 - 5 p.m. PDT Designing Power Markets to Support Socially Optimal Decisions Restructuring of the power industry was intended to provide incentives for more efficient operation and investment.  By "efficiency", I mean full accounting of all social benefits and costs, so that private incentives and social net benefits.  Designers of markets have to balance the desire for “supporting prices” and “incentive compatibility” with needs for transparency and computational practicality, as well as political objectives, such as to provide support for certain favored technologies. This talk will review some specific circumstances in which there have been difficult tradeoffs in market design.  One example is day-ahead "spot" markets, in which strong non-convexities in start-up costs and other features mean that socially optimal schedules might be money losing for power providers.  How do we keep such providers in the market without greatly distorting consumer costs and luring in producers whose costs are too high?  Another is carbon markets; under the Obama Administration's Clean Power Plan, different states could have different systems for capping power market emissions, leading to higher costs and emissions than a consistent national system would.  A third is long-run capacity markets, where the marginal contribution of a resource to system reliability is not always what is rewarded.  European and US markets are contrasted, where EU markets tend to prefer simple linear bids and disregard network constraints, while US markets generally attempt to calculate prices that reflect as many network limits as practical while modeling individual generator limits in detail.  As computational power increases, should the US continue in the direction of ever more complex clearing mechanisms for power markets? Bio: Benjamin F. Hobbs is the Theodore M. and Kay W. Schad Chair of Environmental Management at the Johns Hopkins University, and has been a member of the faculty of that university’s Department of Geography & Environmental Engineering since 1995. His research and teaching concerns the application of optimization, economics, and decision analysis to electric power policy, planning, and operations and to water and ecosystem management.        Since 2010, he has been the inaugural Director of the JHU Environment, Energy, Sustainability & Health Institute.  He co-directs the Yale-JHU SEARCH (Solutions for Energy, Air, Climate, and Health) Center. Previously, he was at Brookhaven and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and on the faculty of the departments of Systems Engineering and Civil Engineering at Case Western Reserve University.  He earned a Ph.D. in Environmental Systems Engineering in 1983 from Cornell University.         Dr. Hobbs has had visiting appointments at the Helsinki University of Technology, University of Washington, ECN (Netherlands Energy Research Center), Cambridge University, and Churchill College, where he was Overseas Fellow.  He is presently on sabbatical at the Department of Electrical Engineering, the University of Washington, and at the California Institute of Technology.        Dr. Hobbs chairs the Market Surveillance Committee of the California Independent System Operator, and is a Fellow of IEEE and INFORMS Campus room: BAG 154 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Clean Energy Institute

  • Oct 13: Women in Science & Engr fall mentor night

    Thu Oct 13, 2016 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm | Thursday, Oct 13, 2016, 5:30 - 8 p.m. PDT Engineering and sciences majors are welcome; even if you're a Pre-engineer or Pre-sciences status, still come and enjoy this experience! This is a great opportunity to network with and get career advice from professionals in the industry. Don’t miss out! Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: South Ballroom Event types: Not Specified Event sponsors: Amazon More info: bit.do…

  • Oct 17: Deadline: Nominate an Engineer for a Diamond Award

    Mon Oct 17, 2016 12:00 am | Monday, Oct 17, 2016 The Diamond Awards honor outstanding alumni and friends who have made significant contributions to the field of engineering. If you know an engineer who deserves recognition, we want to hear from you! Take time to nominate an engineer to join the distinguished ranks of Diamond Award honorees. Nominations for the 2017 awards are being accepted for the following categories: Distinguished Achievement in Industry Distinguished Achievement in Academia Entrepreneurial Excellence Distinguished Service Early Career Event types: Special Events, Not Specified More info: www.engr.washington.edu…

  • Oct 18: MolES Seminar: Jeff Brinker, U of New Mexico

    Tue Oct 18, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Oct 18, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PDT Protocells: Mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers for targeted delivery Our group recently developed a new class of modular nanocarriers that synergistically combine features of mesoporous silica nanoparticles and liposomes. Fusion of liposomes (or native cell membranes) to a spherical, high-surface-area, mesoporous silica core followed by modification of the resulting supported lipid bilayer (SLB) with multiple copies of a targeting peptide, an endosomolytic peptide, and/or PEG results in a nanocarrier construct (the ‘protocell’) that, compared with liposomes improves on capacity, selectivity, and stability and enables targeted delivery and controlled release of high concentrations of multicomponent cargos (chemotherapeutic drugs, siRNA, etc.) within the cytosol or nucleus of cancer cells. Specifically, owing to its high surface area, the mesoporous silica core possesses a higher capacity for therapeutic and diagnostic agents than similarly sized liposomes. The fluid but stable SLB allows multivalent interactions with the target cell at very low targeting peptide densities, features crucial to maximizing specific binding, minimizing nonspecific binding, reducing dosage, and mitigating immunogenicity. Protocells were developed using an in vitro model. Recently we have developed an accessible ex ovo chick egg embryo model (the chorioallantoic membrane model), in which we can we image dynamic nanoparticle/cellular interactions at the individual nanoparticle scale within a complex fluid environment. CAM studies accelerate the translation of in vitro to in vivo. CAM studies along with in vivo fluorescence and radiolabeling studies (SPECT) reveal the requirement of achieving in vivo colloidal stability in order to avoid non-specific binding and to enable specific/targeted binding and drug delivery to individual circulating leukemia cells. About the speaker Jeff Brinker received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Ceramic Science and Engineering at Rutgers University (1972-1978) and joined Sandia National Laboratories as a Member of the Technical Staff in 1979. In 2003 Brinker was appointed as the fifth Sandia National Laboratory Fellow (the highest technical position at Sandia – there have been only eight fellows over the sixty seven year history of the lab beginning with the Manhattan Project). He is currently Distinguished and Regent’s Professor of Chemical Engineering and Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Co-Director of the Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, and Member of the Cancer Center at UNM, Fellow, Sandia National Laboratories, and Distinguished Affiliate Scientist at the Sandia/Los Alamos National Laboratories Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT). Over his thirty seven year career at Sandia and UNM, Brinker has made numerous pioneering contributions to processing, characterization, and understanding of porous and composite nanostructured materials and to the development of new classes of nanoparticle-based therapeutics for treatment of cancer and rare and infectious diseases. Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: www.unm.edu…

  • Oct 19: UW SEBA Career Fair

    Wed Oct 19, 2016 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, 12 - 5 p.m. PDT The University of Washington Science & Engineering Career Fair is geared towards uniting science and engineering students and the continually growing number of companies in the Pacific Northwest and throughout the nation. We pride ourselves on bringing high caliber Husky students and businesses together. Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Event types: Information Sessions, Special Events More info: uwseba.com…

  • Oct 19: UW SEBA Career Fair

    Wed Oct 19, 2016 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Wednesday, Oct 19, 2016, 12 - 5 p.m. PDT The University of Washington Science & Engineering Career Fair is geared towards uniting science and engineering students and the continually growing number of companies in the Pacific Northwest and throughout the nation. We pride ourselves on bringing high caliber Husky students and businesses together. Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Event types: Information Sessions, Special Events More info: uwseba.com…

  • Oct 19: HCDE Seminar: Legacy, Technology & Change

    Wed Oct 19, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Oct 19, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PDT Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. We live in a world of seemingly constant transformations in the technologies we use and rely on, e.g., the devices in our hands, the ways we travel from one location to another, or our methods of communication. And yet we also live with and manage the technologies of the past: our CDs (and increasingly our MP3s); our old documents, both paper and digital; and the twitchy oven in the kitchen. These challenges of managing old and new personal technologies are mirrored in the worlds of business, science and government: all must look to the new while retaining some of the old. Using the example of long-term research infrastructures, this presentation will examine the tensions of ever evolving information and communication technologies over the past decades, and the challenges (and advantages) of managing and sustaining legacy technologies. The talk will examine the 'modernist' vision that argues for sweeping away the past to replace it with the new, and elucidate sociotechnical strategies that seek to prepare and design for change. Ultimately, our knowledge of how to think and design for the long-term is an incomplete project; there is no single answer. Instead, this talk will seek to open a space for design and engineering that takes into consideration the long and often unpredictable arcs of social and technical change. About David Ribes Dr. David Ribes is an Associate Professor in the University of Washington's department of Human Centered Design & Engineering. His research and teaching interests lie at the intersection of sociology, philosophy and history, and he is a member of Science and Technology Studies (STS). His current investigations focus on the ecology of AIDS research infrastructures and the shifting sociotechnical architectures and transformations in information technologies that have guided and shaped HIV/AIDS science over the past 30 years. He is a principal investigator on several National Science Foundation awards and has also been a participant in National Institutes of Health and Sloan Foundation grants studying the activities of scientists, and exploring new patterns of distributed collaboration. He frequently speaks at conferences focused on research infrastructures as well as the organization and production of scientific knowledge. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Oct 19: Fall Lecture Series Part 1

    Wed Oct 19, 2016 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm | Wednesday, Oct 19, 2016, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. PDT Amy Sue Bix is Professor of History at Iowa State University and director of ISU’s Center for Historical Studies of Technology and Science. Her book ‘Girls Coming to Tech!’: A History of American Engineering Education for Women was published by MIT Press in December, 2013. That work analyzes the story of how women gained entrance to the traditionally male field of engineering in American higher education, looking at both individual experiences and institutional evolution. Campus location: Bank of America Executive Education Center (EXED) Campus room: 110 (Boeing Auditorium ) Event types: Lectures/Seminars More info: bit.do…

  • Oct 24: MSE Industry Day

    Mon Oct 24, 2016 2:30 pm - 8:30 pm | Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, 2:30 - 8:30 p.m. PDT Showcase of MSE graduate students’ cutting-edge research. Register by October 3, 2016 Oral presentations and posters will cover a wide range of topics including clean energy generation and storage, biomaterials, semiconductors, and composites. Who should attend? UW students, faculty, industry representatives, and MSE alumni are welcome. We hope you will help us make this inaugural event a success to create a long-lasting tradition! Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 225 Event types: Academics, Conferences, Exhibits, Information Sessions, Meetings, Student Activities Event sponsors: University of Washington Department of Materials Science & Engineering More info: www.mse.washington.edu…

  • Oct 24: MSE Industry Day

    Mon Oct 24, 2016 2:30 pm - 8:30 pm | Monday, Oct 24, 2016, 2:30 - 8:30 p.m. PDT Showcase of MSE graduate students’ cutting-edge research. Register by October 3, 2016 Oral presentations and posters will cover a wide range of topics including clean energy generation and storage, biomaterials, semiconductors, and composites. Who should attend? UW students, faculty, industry representatives, and MSE alumni are welcome. We hope you will help us make this inaugural event a success to create a long-lasting tradition! Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 225 Event types: Academics, Conferences, Exhibits, Information Sessions, Meetings, Student Activities Event sponsors: University of Washington Department of Materials Science & Engineering More info: www.mse.washington.edu…

  • Oct 25: Human Centered Design & Engineering MS info session *Eastside*

    Tue Oct 25, 2016 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm | Eastside Executive Center, Kirkland, WA Tuesday, Oct 25, 2016, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. PDT Join HCDE's academic advisors as we bring the HCDE Master's Info Session to the east side of Lake Washington. Learn about the Master's curriculum, application process, tuition costs and financing, and potential career paths for Human Centered Design & Engineering graduates. Bring your questions and join us! Find more about the Master of Science in Human Centered Design & Engineering at hcde.uw.edu… Event types: Information Sessions Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Oct 26: MolES Seminar: Nader Engheta (University of Pennsylvania)

    Wed Oct 26, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Wednesday, Oct 26, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PDT Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Molecular Engineering (MOL) Campus room: 315 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: www.seas.upenn.edu…

  • Oct 26: HCDE Seminar Series: Dr. Sean Munson

    Wed Oct 26, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Oct 26, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PDT Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. Talk details coming soon. About Sean A. Munson Dr. Sean A. Munson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE). Munson received his PhD in 2012 at the University of Michigan's School of Information, where he studied the use of software to support positive behavior changes. Munson's work primarily focuses on the domains of political news and opinion access, and health and wellness. He was an Intel PhD fellow. Munson completed his BS in Engineering with a concentration in Systems Design at Olin College in 2006. At Olin, he was one of 30 students who spent a year developing the new college’s curriculum and student life programs before becoming part of the first-ever class. He has been a political blogger and, while working at Boeing, designed concepts for future passenger airplane interiors. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Oct 27: Clean Energy Institute Seminar: Pascal Van Hentenryck, University of Michigan

    Thu Oct 27, 2016 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Oct 27, 2016, 4 - 5 p.m. PDT Campus room: BAG 154 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Clean Energy Institute

  • Nov 1: MolES Seminar: Pieter Culls (University of British Columbia)

    Tue Nov 1, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov 1, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PDT Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: www.liposomes.ca

  • Nov 2: HCDE Seminar Series: Dr. Cecilia Aragon

    Wed Nov 2, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov 2, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PDT Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. Talk details coming soon. About Cecilia Aragon Dr. Cecilia Aragon is a Professor in the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering and a Senior Data Science Fellow at the eScience Institute at the University of Washington. She directs the Human-Centered Data Science Lab. Previously, she was a data scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for six years, after earning her Ph.D. in Computer Science from UC Berkeley in 2004. She earned her B.S. in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on human-centered data science, an emerging field at the intersection of human-computer interaction (HCI), computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW), and the statistical and computational techniques of data science. She and her students develop collaborative visual analytics tools to facilitate data science, and study current scientific practice around large and complex data sets. She has authored or co-authored over 80 peer-reviewed publications and over 100 other publications in the areas of HCI, CSCW, data science, visual analytics, machine learning, and astrophysics. In 2008, she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the US government on outstanding scientists in the early stages of their careers, for her work in collaborative data-intensive science. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Nov 2: Engineering Lecture: Delivering Sustainability: Transporting Goods in Urban Spaces

    Wed Nov 2, 2016 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov 2, 2016, 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. PDT Registration Required Free and open to the public With greenhouse gas emissions threatening the health of the planet at an alarming rate, actions both big and small play an important role in addressing climate change. As the popularity of online shopping and grocery delivery rises, consumers have an opportunity to make more sustainable choices when it comes to transporting goods in urban spaces. Based on new transportation research, what you’ll learn might surprise you. From drones to delivery vans, find out which transportation methods are the most sustainable today and in the future. Speaker: Anne Goodchild, Allan & Inger Osberg Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering Part of the City Smarts: Engineering Resilient Communities lecture series More information and registration available in early September. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 120 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: College of Engineering, UW Alumni Association

  • Nov 3: All-College Meeting

    Thu Nov 3, 2016 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Nov 3, 2016, 3:30 - 5 p.m. PDT Faculty, students and staff, please join us for the annual Fall All-College Meeting. We will have a presentation by the principal and associate principal architects from Payette, who have been working with us to develop the College of Engineering Academic Facilities Plan. They will present an overview of the study and participate in a discussion of COE’s strategic facilities planning. As is tradition, we will also introduce the new faculty that joined the College of Engineering this academic year. This will be followed by a reception with appetizers and beverages. Please mark your calendars, and we will follow up with an agenda and location for this meeting in the coming weeks. Event types: Meetings, Student Activities Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering

  • Nov 8: MolES Seminar: Chris Jewell (University of Maryland, College Park)

    Tue Nov 8, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov 8, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PST Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Winkenwerder Forest Sciences Laboratory (WFS) Campus room: 201 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: www.liposomes.ca

  • Nov 8: MolES Seminar: Chris Jewell (University of Maryland, College Park)

    Tue Nov 8, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov 8, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PST Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: jewell.umd.edu

  • Nov 9: HCDE Seminar Series: Dr. Scott Miles, "The Human Center of Modeling"

    Wed Nov 9, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov 9, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. "What makes for a good model?" In various forms, this question is a question that many people, businesses, and institutions ponder with regards to their particular domain of modeling. Within the natural and social sciences, models may be a purposeful aggregation of data, a visual representation, or an interactive computer simulation, among other possible forms. In this talk, we will discuss prevailing views of science-intensive models, modeling, and model “goodness”, as well as why modeling should be conducted within an explicitly considered human-centered context. Dr. Miles will put science-intensive modeling into this context by drawing on ideas from science and technology studies, American Pragmatism, and two decades of social, natural, and technical systems modeling experience within government, private-sector, and research settings. The problem of how we talk about and determine model goodness within science-intensive settings has much to do with how we perceive the utility of science, engineering, and modeling. Most simply, good models should be good actors that are effective facilitators within sociotechnical groups. These model-actors must transparently and credibly afford the active building of consensus-based decisions rather than be co-conspirators in burying human values and interests under jargon-laden passivity and self-righteousness. About Scott Miles Dr. Scott Miles is an expert on disaster risk reduction, community resilience, and lifeline infrastructure. He is currently a research scientist in the department of Human Centered Design and Engineering at University of Washington and a private consultant. As a social scientist with an engineering background, Dr. Miles has a strong foundation in both quantitative and qualitative analysis methods. Dr. Miles has received grant funding or contracts from the National Science Foundation, Natural Hazards Center, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, Washington State Emergency Management Division, Washington State Department of Ecology, King Count Office of Emergency Management, NOAA, and USGS, among others. Dr. Miles received his PhD in geography from University of Washington, where he studied the synergy between urban geography, geological hazards, disaster recovery, spatial simulation modeling, and collaborative process design. He received a post-graduate diploma from the University of Edinburgh in GIS, with a focus on environmental modeling. His MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering is from University of Massachusetts-Amherst, where he focused on geotechnical earthquake engineering and numerical methods. An undergraduate degree in the same field was received from Washington State University. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Nov 11: Veteran's Day (no classes)

    Fri Nov 11, 2016 12:00 am | Friday, Nov 11, 2016 University holiday, no classes Year: 2016 Quarter: Autumn Event types: Academics

  • Nov 14: HCDE Research Showcase

    Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm | Monday, Nov 14, 2016, 4 - 7 p.m. PST Join the department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for a showcase of the latest research from our faculty and students.  Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: 334 Event types: Exhibits, Special Events

  • Nov 15: MolES Seminar: Steve Sligar (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Tue Nov 15, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PST Revealing the Structure and Function of Membrane Proteins Through Nanotechnology Membrane proteins are involved in numerous vital biological processes, including transport, signal transduction and the enzymes in a variety of metabolic pathways. Integral membrane proteins account for up to 30% of the human proteome and make up more than half of all currently marketed therapeutic targets. Unfortunately, membrane proteins are inherently recalcitrant to study using the normal toolkit available to scientists, and one is most often left with the challenge of finding inhibitors, activators and specific antibodies using a denatured or detergent solubilized aggregate.  Often, since membrane proteins are inherently insoluble and prone to aggregation and oligomerization in solution, the active state of interest is obscured.  The Nanodisc platform circumvents these challenges by providing a self-assembled system that renders typically insoluble, yet biologically and pharmacologically significant, targets such as receptors, transporters, enzymes, and viral antigens soluble in aqueous media.  Because Nanodisc constructs provide a native-like bilayer environment that maintain a target’s functional activity, they are a versatile tool in the study of membrane proteins such as ion channels, GPCRs, cytochrome P450s, blood coagulation factors, various toxins and viral entities as well as a plethora of pharmaceutical targets.  In addition to the opportunities in drug discovery, Nanodiscs provide a nanometer scale vehicle for the in vivo delivery of amphipathic drugs, therapeutic lipids, tethered nucleic acids, imaging agents and active protein complexes.  In my presentation I will focus on recent uses of the Nanodisc technology in seeking mechanistic understanding of metalloprotein oxygenases, integrin and KRas4b signaling and Alzheimer’s disease intervention. Stephen G. Sligar Swanlund Endowed Chair, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Stephen G. Sligar received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Illinois in 1975.  Dr. Sligar served on the faculty in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale University and returned to the University of Illinois in 1982 where he was the I. C. Gunsalus Professor of Biochemistry. He now holds the University of Illinois Swanlund Endowed Chair and is Director of the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology. He is also a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry, the Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology and the College of Medicine. Dr. Sligar holds affiliate appointments in the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, the Institute for Genomic Biology and The Micro and Nano Technology Laboratory on the Illinois campus. He is a Fellow of the Biophysical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Awards include a the Sober Lectureship from the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a Fulbright Research Scholarship, Senior Fellowship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, an NIH MIRA Award, an NIH Merit Award and the Bert L. and Kuggie Vallee Visiting Professorship in Inorganic Chemistry at Oxford where he was a Fellow of Queens College. He is also a Fellow in the Jerome Karle Nobel Laureate World Innovation Foundation and an Academic Leadership Fellow from the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: sligarlab.life.uiuc.edu

  • Nov 16: HCDE Seminar Series: Dr. Liz Gerber, "The Future of Collective Innovation"

    Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. Socio-technical infrastructure offers remarkable opportunities for improving innovation and the global economy by engaging geographically distributed and diverse individuals to identify, ideate, and implement new ideas, expanding the sources of innovation beyond the formal organization. But it is also possible that collective innovation will fail to achieve its potential by becoming increasingly professionalized potentially raising the expectations for participation and failing to reach out to diverse networks, undermining participation from individuals who participate. Can we foresee a future of collective innovation in which there is broad participation from identification to ideation and ultimately implementation? This position paper frames the major challenges that stand in the way of this goal. Drawing on theory from social computing and organizational theory, I outline a framework that will support collective innovation that is inclusive, collaborative, and comprehensive and highlight 5 challenge areas: Roles, Communication, Trust, Reputation, Feedback, and Job Design. About Liz Gerber Associate Professor of Design and Faculty Founder, Design for America Dr. Liz Gerber serves as Associate Professor of Design in the School of Engineering and School of Communication, as Director of the Design Research Cluster, and as the Faculty Founder of Design for America at the Northwestern University. Dr. Gerber researches the role of technology and organization in the innovation process. Her work is generously funded by NSF, Microsoft, and the MacArthur Foundation. She received her PhD and MS in Management Science and Engineering and Product Design from Stanford University. Learn more about Dr. Gerber and her work at www.lizgerber.com and connect with her on Twitter at @elizgerber. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Nov 16: Information Session: Master of Science in Human Centered Design & Engineering

    Wed Nov 16, 2016 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm | Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016, 6 - 7 p.m. PST Join HCDE's academic advisors for an overview of the HCDE Master's program - including curriculum, application process, tuition costs and financing, and potential career paths for Human Centered Design & Engineering graduates. ​ Bring your questions and join us! Campus location: Sieg Hall (SIG) Campus room: 232 Event types: Information Sessions Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Nov 16: Engineering Lecture: Understanding Our Chemical Fingerprints: Safer Water for Our Cities

    Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016, 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. PST Registration Required Free and open to the public Although more than 80,000 chemicals are in circulation and thousands of new chemicals are introduced each year, only a handful are comprehensively evaluated for safety by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through our daily actions, humans leave a distinctive chemical fingerprint on water, which can linger for years, impacting salmon populations and other fish, animals and plants, as well as people’s health and safety. Learn about the paths chemicals take from homes, factories and offices into the waters around us, the developing systems aimed at identifying and removing toxic chemicals, and discover the link between our chemicals and our ability to coexist with the ecosystem. Speaker: Ed Kolodziej, Associate Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering Part of the City Smarts: Engineering Resilient Communities lecture series More information and registration available in early September. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 120 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: College of Engineering, UW Alumni Association

  • Nov 22: MolES Seminar: Elizabeth Nance (University of Washington)

    Tue Nov 22, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PST Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • Nov 24: Thanksgiving (no classes)

    Thu Nov 24, 2016 12:00 am | Thursday, Nov 24 - Friday, Nov 25, 2016 University holiday, no classes Year: 2016 Quarter: Autumn Event types: Academics

  • Nov 29: MolES Seminar: Craig Brown (NIST Center for Neutron Research)

    Tue Nov 29, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov 29, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PST Structural Studies of Metal Organic Frameworks for Adsorption and Separation Applications Adsorption of molecules in functionalized and high surface area microporous materials is of technological importance in a multitude of areas ranging from chemical separations to energy storage. Over the past several years we have focused our research efforts on understanding the properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites for storage and separations of industrially important small molecules such as hydrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, noble gases, and short chain organics.  Besides the geometrical and porosity control in either class of materials, the properties of metal-organic frameworks can be tuned to optimize electrostatic interactions by exposing open metal cation sites.  Here, I will briefly illustrate some of the capabilities available at the NIST Center for Neutron Research and reflect on some of the characteristics of neutrons that make them suitable for the study of a wide variety of materials. An in-depth look at results obtained on MOFs illustrate the power, and limitations, of diffraction in elucidating many of the governing characteristics of these material properties and the interactions with the guest molecules. About the speaker Craig Brown is a Chemist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Center for Neutron Research where heads the Structure and Dynamics of Material team and is an Adjunct faculty in the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Delaware. After completing his undergraduate degree at the University of Cambridge, U.K., he spent most of his time as a graduate researcher in Grenoble, France. Here he used neutron at the Institut Laue-Langevin, X-rays at the ESRF synchrotron, and muons at the Paul Scherrer Institute to study the structure, magnetism, superconductivity, dynamics, and diffusive behavior of intercalated Fullerenes. His research interests have continued with the use of X-ray and neutron scattering to study the structure and dynamics of a wide array of materials from proteins to highly porous metal-organic frameworks. This has led to him being widely published with over 140 papers and over 6000 citations and a H-index of 40. He has received several awards including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the Department of Commerce Silver Medal, and most recently NISTs Stratton Award for unusually significant research contributions. Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: www.ncnr.nist.gov…

  • Nov 30: HCDE Seminar Series: Dr. Julie Kientz, "Considerations for the Connected Family"

    Wed Nov 30, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov 30, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. Societal ideas of family life and healthy child development increasingly include notions of the ways in which families should and should not engage with information and communication technologies. In this talk, I will discuss results from a series of studies from my research lab in which we investigate families’ current practices, values, aspirations, and fears in relation to their use of connected technologies. Computing can support families in a variety of ways, and novel systems to support family health and wellness can improve child-development outcomes and family well-being. Research from my lab has also found that families have a sense of ambivalence about their use of technology, driven in part by social narratives that portray it as a negative and intrusive presence in family life. I will close the presentation with twelve considerations for designing for connected families. About Julie Kientz Dr. Julie Kientz is an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering. She is also Director of the Computing for Healthy Living and Learning (CHiLL) Lab and is active in the University of Washington's Design Use Build (DUB) Group alliance. Her research interests are in the areas of human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, and health informatics. In particular, Kientz is interested in determining how novel computing applications can address important issues in health and education and evaluating those applications through long-term real world deployment studies using a balance of qualitative and quantitative methods. Her most recent research involves the design and evaluation of computing technologies to support parents tracking the developmental progress and health of their newborn children, individuals with sleep disorders, and families with children with autism. Kientz received her PhD in Computer Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008 and her BS in Computer Science & Engineering from the University of Toledo in 2002. She was awarded a National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2009, named an MIT Technology Review Innovator Under 35 in 2013, and was given the UW College of Engineering Faculty Research Innovator award in 2014. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Dec 1: Clean Energy Institute Seminar: Yuriy Roman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Thu Dec 1, 2016 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Dec 1, 2016, 4 - 5 p.m. PST Campus room: BAG 154 Event types: Lectures/Seminars

  • Dec 6: MolES Seminar: Niren Murthy (University of California, Berkeley)

    Tue Dec 6, 2016 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm | Tuesday, Dec 6, 2016, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. PST Molecular Engineering and Sciences Seminar Series This weekly seminar brings together students, faculty and invited guests from various disciplines across campus to explore current trends in molecular engineering and nanotechnology. It is a  forum for active interdisciplinary discussions.  These talks are open to the public and attract a diverse audience of students and faculty. Campus location: Anderson Hall (AND) Campus room: 223 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Molecular Engineering & Sciences Twitter: #MolESseminar More info: murthylab.berkeley.edu

  • Dec 7: HCDE Seminar Series: Dr. David McDonald, "Who Wants to Read This?!?"

    Wed Dec 7, 2016 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Dec 7, 2016, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST Please join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering for the 2016 HCDE Seminar Series. Full series at hcde.uw.edu/seminar-series. Talk details coming soon. About David W. McDonald Dr. David W. McDonald is a Professor and Chair in the University of Washington's department of Human Centered Design & Engineering. David's research interests span computer supported cooperative work, human-computer interaction and social computing. He currently has ongoing projects to analyze and design facilitation mechanisms for mass interaction in large-scale online communities. Campus location: Miller Hall (MLR) Campus room: 301 Event types: Lectures/Seminars Event sponsors: Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Dec 7: Information Session: Master of Science in Human Centered Design & Engineering

    Wed Dec 7, 2016 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm | Wednesday, Dec 7, 2016, 6 - 7 p.m. PST Join HCDE's academic advisors for an overview of the HCDE Master's program - including curriculum, application process, tuition costs and financing, and potential career paths for Human Centered Design & Engineering graduates. Bring your questions and join us! Campus location: Sieg Hall (SIG) Campus room: 232 Event types: Information Sessions Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…