Upcoming Calendar Events

  • Nov 3: MolES seminar: Junghae Suh, Rice

    Mon Nov 3, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PST Developing virus nanoparticle (VNP)-based gene delivery vectors  Delivering nucleic acid-based therapeutics into target cells specifically is a considerable biomedical challenge. Using concepts and tools from virology, protein engineering, and molecular biology, we are interested in developing virus nanoparticle (VNP)-based gene delivery vectors to tackle this challenge with a different perspective. In particular, we are building a toolkit of VNPs that can conduct basic biomolecular computation in order to mediate targeted delivery. We are in the initial stages of programming defined logic operators into the virus nanostructure and have successfully created VNP prototypes that are activated by proteolytic tumor biomarkers. Additionally, we are interested in building bionano devices that are hybrid structures of VNPs and proteins. For example, in one of our projects we are interested in creating VNPs that can be used for imaging and therapy simultaneously. Unfortunately, incomplete knowledge of capsid biology makes it difficult to rationally design brightly fluorescent and fully infectious viruses. To overcome this problem, we generated a platform gene library that was used to make large libraries of virus mutants displaying fluorescent proteins on the capsid and then selected for variants with desired infectivity and fluorescent properties. This platform library can be used in the future to create other types of VNP-protein hybrid devices. Collectively, our work aims to engineer VNPs in creative ways for potential use in a broad range of biomedical applications. Bio: Dr. Suh received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering at MIT and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Before joining the Rice University department of Bioengineering as an assistant professor in 2007, she completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Laboratory of Genetics at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Her graduate research focused on understanding the interaction of nanoscale systems, either nature-derived or human-engineered, with complex biological environments in an effort to discover ruling paradigms that govern the performance of nanoparticles designed for biomedicine. Her postdoctoral research focused on studying how natural viruses interface with cellular machinery, particularly those that maintain homeostasis in the cell nucleus. Such studies should uncover new insights into how synthetic nanoparticle systems can be designed to yield the performance efficiencies rivaling that of viruses. Currently, Dr. Suh works at the interface of virology, biophysics, molecular biology, and protein engineering to investigate and create novel virus-based materials for various biomedical applications. By manipulating the “inputs” and “outputs” of virus nanoparticles (VNP), she endeavors to develop platform technologies that can be used as therapeutics for a broad range of human diseases. She was awarded the NSF CAREER Award and the MDACC Ovarian Cancer SPORE Career Development Program Award for her innovative work on reprogramming viruses as therapeutic platforms. Additionally, Dr. Suh was part of the multi-institutional team of investigators that was awarded an NIH Grand Opportunities grant aimed at investigating the intracellular transport of a variety of engineered nanomaterials used for biomedical applications. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend.

  • Nov 3: HCDE Master's Info Session

    Mon Nov 3, 2014 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm | Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. PST Join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) to learn more about the HCDE Master's degree. All sessions are held from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in Sieg Hall, Room 420, on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Learn more and apply at hcde.uw.edu/ms. Campus location: Sieg Hall (SIG) Campus room: 420 Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Nov 4: Coffee with the Dean

    Tue Nov 4, 2014 8:00 am - 9:30 am | Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, 8 - 9:30 a.m. PST 8:00 - Networking and Breakfast  8:30 - Dean's talk Submit questions by October 28 to smartin3@uw.edu. Campus location: University of Washington Club (FAC)

  • Nov 4: MolES Seminar: Trends behind wearable electronics

    Tue Nov 4, 2014 11:00 am - 12:00 pm | Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. PST Functional Nanomaterials and Nanofabrication Processes for Flexible Device Applications Wearable electronics is becoming a new paradigm for the next generation computing and electronic systems. Leading global companies such as Google, Samsung and Apple are investing huge efforts towards the development and commercialization of wearable and flexible electronic systems. The essential components for the wearable electronic systems are circuit components (eg. transistors and RFIC), display (eg. visual and tactile display), power devices (eg. battery and solar cells), sensors (biosensors and environment sensors), etc. In this talk, I will discuss recent trends and state-of-the-art technology in these component and systems for wearable electronics. Then, I will discuss various chemical and physical sensors that are being developed at our laboratory in KAIST. In specific, I will explain about (1) metal oxide nanowire based flexible gas sensors for toxic gases, (2) metal nanotube based flexible gas sensors for hydrogen gas, (3) photosensitive nanomaterial based flexible UV sensors and (4) metal nanowire / CNT based flexible and stretchable strain sensors for the human motion detection.  Bio: Professor Inkyu Park received his Ph.D. (mechanical engineering) at UC Berkeley in 2007. He received a B.S. and M.S. degrees (mechanical engineering) from KAIST in 1998 and UIUC in 2003, respectively. He worked as a research specialist at Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center (BSAC) in 2007-08 and a visiting researcher at Hewlett Packard Lab in 2005-08. He is currently an associate professor at the department of mechanical engineering @ KAIST. He is an expert in the nanofabrication, sensing devices & systems and mechanical reliability of micro/nano systems. He has published more than 100 articles in international journals and conferences. He also received several awards including Hewlett Packard (HP) Open Innovation Research Award in 2009-2012 and Best Paper Award in IEEE NANO 2010  Campus location: Molecular Engineering (MOL) Campus room: 315 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend.

  • Nov 4: Shobe Prize info session: quick pitches

    Tue Nov 4, 2014 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm | Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, 2 - 3 p.m. PST Learn how to put together a quick pitch for your tech or design idea for the Shobe Prize competition.  Each team must have at least one matriculated student (undergraduate or graduate) enrolled in any of the UW departments involved in dub (dub.washington.edu). Campus location: Sieg Hall (SIG) Campus room: HCDE Design Lab (Sieg 233) Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) More info: www.hcde.washington.edu…

  • Nov 4: Lecture: Cell Biomechanics in Cardiovascular Health

    Tue Nov 4, 2014 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, 7 - 8:30 p.m. PST Join us for the second night of the 2014 Engineering Lecture SeriesGet a Grip: Cell Biomechanics in Cardiovascular Health Speakers: Nate Sniadecki, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Nathan White, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Bioengineering Our cardiovascular system depends on active cells that stretch, contract and twitch to keep our bodies healthy. These cells create blood clots when we have an injury to prevent blood loss and help pump blood through our bodies during exercise. By studying the biomechanics of these cells, mechanical engineers and physicians at the UW are finding lifesaving solutions that improve blood clotting to help us heal from traumatic injuries. Come hear how their work is changing medicine at a cellular level. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 120 Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering and UW Alumni Association Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: engage.washington.edu…

  • Nov 5: Beyond Designing Systems for Users with Mark Haselkorn

    Wed Nov 5, 2014 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST One of the most compelling directions for Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) focuses on facilitating complex communities in the organization and use of their information sharing environment.  Co-designing this system of systems with a vast and diverse array of stakeholders requires HCDEers to exercise skills and engage in roles that expand beyond the skillset and roles often associated with interface and system design.  Examples from the ongoing Maritime Operations Information Sharing Analysis (MOISA) project are used to explore this exciting and rapidly evolving area of HCDE. About the Speaker Mark Haselkorn is a Professor in the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering. Haselkorn leads University of Washington (UW) partnerships in the National Center for Cognitive Informatics & Decision Making in Healthcare, funded by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, as well as the Center of Excellence on Visual Analytics for Command, Control, and Interoperability Environments, funded by the Department of Homeland Security. He is Director of the Pacific Rim Visualization and Analytics Center, which has the mission of advancing visual analytics for the enhancement of distributed, collaborative cognition and decision-making for public safety and security. He also founded and directs the UW’s Interdisciplinary Program on Humanitarian Relief, a cross-campus program of research and education that works with the international humanitarian sector to improve logistics and service systems. In this area, one of Haselkorn’s current PhD students, Robin Mays, has received a three-year National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship (2012–2016). Campus location: Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Campus room: 241 Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering, University of Washington Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Nov 6: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: Venkat Subramanian, Associate Professor Chemical Engineering, University of Washington

    Thu Nov 6, 2014 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, 4 - 5 p.m. PST Model Based Battery Management System (BMS) for Electric Transportation and Renewable Microgrids Lithium ion batteries are a promising technology to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels for transportation and for the creation of resilient and reliable renewable microgrids. However, battery manufacturers overdesign lithium ion batteries used in electric vehicle to ensure safety and life due to the uncertainty of the internal states of the cell. Proactive battery management systems (BMS) and advanced sensing technologies offer an opportunity to significantly reduce the cost and weight of transportation batteries, and circumvent problems arising due to capacity fade and safety concerns. This talk will describe how multiscale electrochemical engineering models, mathematical model reformulation and the use of robust algorithms can alleviate some of these problems to help electrify the transportation industry by improving the range of variables that are predictable and controllable in a battery in real-timewithin an electric vehicle. The use of battery models in a BMS will be analyzed. The interplay between the fundamental depth in modeling, choice of numerical algorithms, and application driven problem formulation will be presented. The validity of implementation in a microcontroller environment for model predictive control (MPC) will be addressed and demonstrated. In addition, preliminary results on aggressive sizing and control strategies for batteries in renewable microgrids will be presented. Bio: Venkat Subramanian is Washington Research Foundation Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Clean Energy.Associate Professor at the University of Washington.  He holds a B. Tech, Chemical & Electrochemical Engineering, Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI), Karaikudi, India and a  Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia. Prof. Subramanian’s research focuses on modeling, analyzing and designing cost-effective, energy-efficient and environmentally benign electrochemical systems, in particular devices such as batteries, solar cells, fuel cells and sensors.  His group has developed the fastest algorithm reported in the literature for simulating the performance of lithium-ion batteries.  Prof. Subramanian holds an adjunct appointment in Electrical Engineering, and will be an active collaborator with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).  Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: EEB 125 Event sponsors: The Clean Energy Institute Interdisciplinary Seminar Series was established to bring distinguished leaders in the field of clean energy to campus to present their research and meet students, postdocs, and faculty from departments across the Colleges of Arts & Sciences, Engineering, and the Environment. CEI seminars take place regularly throughout the quarter on Thursday afternoons.

  • Nov 6: Forest and Environmental Sciences and Sustainability: A Quest for the 21st Century

    Thu Nov 6, 2014 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm | Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, 4:30 - 6 p.m. PST UW Civil & Environmental Engineering's 2014 Edward Wenk, Jr. Endowed Lectureship in Technology and Public Policy is entitled: "Forest and Environmental Sciences and Sustainability: A Quest for the 21st Century"Speaker: Thomas H. DeLuca, professor and director of the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS) at the University of Washington Reception immediately following For more information about the lecture, see the lecture abstract (PDF). Thomas DeLuca is professor and director of the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS) at the University of Washington. A forest soil scientist and ecosystem ecologist, Dr. DeLuca conducts research and directs a School with around 40 faculty members, 160 graduate students, and more than 400 undergraduate students. SEFS operates several facilities on the UW campus, along with four outlying research and education centers. The Edward Wenk, Jr. Endowed Lectureship in Technology and Public Policy brings to the University distinguished practitioners in the field of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Public Policy who engage the context of social, economic, political, and environmental impacts through their knowledge, analytical tools, and professional experience. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 210 Event sponsors: UW Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

  • Nov 10: MolES seminar: Matthew Bush, UW Chemistry

    Mon Nov 10, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Monday, Nov. 10, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PST Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry of Biomolecular Assemblies Native mass spectrometry is an emerging approach for characterizing the stoichiometry, assembly, and shapes of protein complexes and other biomolecular assemblies in solution. Native mass spectrometry is especially useful for investigating biomolecular assemblies that are challenging to characterize using condensed-phase experiments, including those that are heterogeneous, have large mass, and are membrane bound. I will discuss how my lab has uses ion mobility mass spectrometry and ion/ion chemistry to probe the structures and dynamics of proteins and protein complexes, including fusion proteins between the ATPase from the type II secretion system of vibrio cholera and a scaffold protein that was used to direct its assembly. Bio: Matt Bush pursued his Ph.D. from 2003-2008 with Evan Williams and Richard Saykally at the University of California, Berkeley. During that time he used infrared laser spectroscopy and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to investigate zwitterion formation in gas-phase biomolecules and the structural effects of hydration on biomolecular and multiply charged ions. This training in high-performance mass spectrometry and physical chemistry laid the ground work for his continued pursuits using gas-phase techniques to investigate the structures and interactions of biomolecules. In 2008 he joined the laboratory of Carol Robinson FRS DBE at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford, during which time he was a Waters Research Fellow, a Junior Research Fellow of Jesus College, University of Oxford, and developed experimental and analytical frameworks for using ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments to accurately characterize the structures of drug-like molecules, peptides, and protein complexes. He joined the chemistry faculty at the University of Washington in 2011, where he is also a member of the Biological Physics, Structure and Design Program and the Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute. His research group is focused on developing mass spectrometry based approaches for elucidating the structures, assembly, and dynamics of protein complexes. His group applies these approaches to a wide range of biological systems, including those involved in bacterial secretion, regulating protein degradation, and protein homeostasis. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend.

  • Nov 11: Veteran's Day (no classes)

    Tue Nov 11, 2014 12:00 am | Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014 University holiday, no classes Year: 2014 Quarter: Autumn

  • Nov 12: Designing Tailored Motivators with Gary Hsieh

    Wed Nov 12, 2014 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST Designing effective incentives is a challenge across many domains, from attracting technology users to nudging behavior change to compensating study participants. Unfortunately, current designs often employ a one-incentive-fits-all approach, assuming that one single reward would work sufficiently for everyone. This overlooks the fact that people are heterogenously motivated; people do not all hold the same values and have the same needs. A single reward, therefore, may not appeal to everyone, and it could also undermine diversity by attracting only certain types of people to participate. An alternative design is to offer individually tailored motivators. While this idea works well in theory, there are many unanswered research questions for this approach to be a viable option. What motivators should we use? Under what circumstances should we use these motivators? How do we design these systems to provide sufficient user control. In this talk, Hsieh will discuss early efforts and challenges in developing tailored motivators. About the Speaker Gary Hsieh is an Assistant Professor of Human Centered Design & Engineering at the University of Washington. His research focuses on studying, designing, and developing technologies that enable people to interact in ways that are efficient and welfare-improving. He was previously an Assistant Professor in Communication and Information Studies at Michigan State University and has conducted research at multiple industry research labs, including Microsoft, IBM, Intel, and Fuji-Xerox. He received his PhD from the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and his BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at University of California, Berkeley. He is a recipient of the NSF Career Award. Campus location: Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Campus room: 241 Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering, University of Washington Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Nov 13: MolES Special Seminar: David Yu Zhang, Rice University

    Thu Nov 13, 2014 11:00 am - 12:00 pm | Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. PST Nucleic Acid Diagnostics Biotechnologies based on Hybridization Nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) are being increasingly appreciated as biomarkers with diagnostic value, based on rapid development of nucleic acid biotechnology over the past 20 years.  Nucleic acid diagnostics is now a $5B per year industry, with primary applications in cancer and infectious diseases.  There are 4 major metrics for nucleic acid diagnostics: specificity, sensitivity, multiplexing, and speed; current technologies possess strengths and weaknesses in different areas.  At its heart, all nucleic acid biotechnology depends on the reliable Watson-Crick hybridization, be it for PCR primer binding or microarray capture or NGS sequencing-by-synthesis; by improving hybridization properties, we can thus improve all of nucleic acid diagnostic biotechnology.  Our research group specializes in using molecular competition to suppress unintended interactions betwen nucleic acids.  I will talk about our recent progress in developing novel DNA probes and primers, and their use for scientific and technological applications.  We have developed fluorescent probes capable of detecting 0.1% variant allele frequency, and selective primers that achieve 20 cycle ∆Cq in discriminating single nucleotide variants from human genomic DNA.  We have also developed multiplexed probes for quantitating microRNA from human total RNA with log-linear fluorescence response over 6 orders of magnitude.  We have started using these molecular tools for as biotechnology tools in collaboration with a number of companies; simultaneously, we are also using these to improve our basic understanding of DNA and RNA biophysics. Bio: David Yu Zhang is the Ted Law Jr. Assistant Professor of Bioengineering at Rice University.  Dave received his B.S. and Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology, and did his postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School.  His research has led to 19 peer-reviewed publications, 4 issued, and 9 pending patents. Campus location: Molecular Engineering (MOL) Campus room: 315 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend.

  • Nov 13: Fall All-college Meeting

    Thu Nov 13, 2014 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm | Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014, 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. PST Agenda coming soon. Reception follows. Campus room: HUB 250 Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering

  • Nov 13: WiSE Mentor Night

    Thu Nov 13, 2014 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm | Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014, 5:30 - 8 p.m. PST Expand your network. Meet professional women engineers & scientists. Get career and academic advice. Space is limited - Sign up today at bit.ly… Refreshments will be available. Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: Lyceum Event sponsors: UW Women in Science and Engineering and UW Society of Women Engineers Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: www.engr.uw.edu…

  • Nov 17: MolES Seminar: Christy Landes, Rice University

    Mon Nov 17, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Monday, Nov. 17, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PST In Search of Concurrence between Biological and Synthetic Single Molecule Structure/Function Practical goals in materials engineering include minimal cost, maximum efficiency, and optimized longevity. As our experimental and theoretical methods to study nature’s molecular-scale design principles have improved, we have begun to understand that one reason nature can be so successful is that her engineering strategy often differs from ours.  hereas humans usually design materials with a single, well-defined function, nature often acts through redundant or degenerate channels that are individually not as efficient, but collectively, and in the face of damage or wear, outperform their synthetic cousins. Obtaining clues from the iological structure-function interplay presents challenges for theory, experiment, and data analysis. When we study one molecule at a time, we eliminate ensemble averaging, thereby accessing any underlying conformational complexity. However, we must develop new methods to increase information content in the resulting low signal-to-noise single-molecule data. Our central question is: Can we take cues from the structure-function interplay and use of cooperative pathways in nature’s biomolecular processes to inform design principles for tailored functional materials applications? The pursuit of answers to this question presents challenges for theory, measurement, and data interpretation. The talk will present insights into the overall question, as well as attempts to overcome some of the innate challenges encountered along the way. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend.

  • Nov 18: Lecture: Wireless Power for Implantable Devices

    Tue Nov 18, 2014 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm | Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014, 7 - 8:30 p.m. PST Join us for the third night of the 2014 Engineering Lecture SeriesCutting the Cord: Wireless Power for Implantable Devices Speaker: Joshua Smith, Associate Professor, Computer Science & Engineering and Electrical Engineering You or someone you know may rely on a cardiac pacemaker, heart pump or other implantable device. Powering these common medical devices is challenging. Existing approaches include batteries that must be surgically replaced every few years and cables extending out of the body, which can attract infection. It is becoming increasingly feasible to use wireless signals from a source placed in clothing or furniture—and perhaps even from cellular and television signal towers—to power implanted devices. Learn about emerging wireless technologies that may impact the quality of life for many individuals. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 120 Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering and UW Alumni Association Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: engage.washington.edu…

  • Nov 19: Wayfaring and Wandering in a Digital Age with Daniela Rosner

    Wed Nov 19, 2014 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST The Hearts and Minds of Data Science Daniela Rosner, HCDE Assistant Professor November 19, 2014 4:30–5:20 p.m. Mary Gates Hall (MGH), room 241 Learn more at hcde.uw.edu/current-issues-in-hcde Campus location: Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Campus room: 241 Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering, University of Washington Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Nov 24: MolES seminar: Cole DeForest, UW ChemE

    Mon Nov 24, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PST Directed Cell Fate in a Couple of Clicks: Dynamic Tailorability of the Stem Cell Niche There is a growing interest in understanding how a cell senses its microenvironment and how these external cues influence important cellular functions.  Such information may be particularly important from a fundamental perspective (e.g., defining the stem cell niche), as well as from the applied viewpoint of regenerating functional tissue equivalents.  Though both chemical and mechanical signals have been implicated in dictating local cell behavior, isolated effects are difficult to assess in vivo due to the myriad of uncontrollable, ever-changing cues.  In addition, many of these cues are presented in spatiotemporally-complex patterns.  To better understand how cells receive instructive information from their extracellular niche, synthetic environments including hydrogels have proven beneficial at assaying cell function in well-defined systems where single cues can be introduced and subsequent effects can be individually elucidated.  Unfortunately, few 3D culture platforms allow the experimenter to recapitulate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of the native tissue environment through 4D control of the material properties in both time and space.  In this work, we demonstrate that by utilizing multiple photoreactions that are each initiated with different wavelengths of light, we can independently induce changes to the local physical and chemical material properties at specific locations within a hydrogel culture platform to direct real-time changes in cell function.  This talk will detail the synthesis and characterization of these dynamically-tunable hydrogel materials and will highlight several examples where user-triggered alterations in the cellular niche can be used to both better understand and direct stem cell fate. Bio: Dr. Cole A. DeForest is a formally-trained chemical engineer with additional expertise in material science, organic synthesis, polymer chemistry, bioengineering, biophysics, protein engineering, and photochemistry. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Washington and a Member of the Institute for Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine. His research aims to develop dynamically-tunable biomaterial platforms that aid in understanding fundamental biological processes and to exploit this ascertained information in the engineering of functional human tissue. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend.

  • Nov 27: Thanksgiving (no classes)

    Thu Nov 27, 2014 12:00 am | Thursday, Nov. 27 - Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 University holiday, no classes Year: 2014 Quarter: Autumn

  • Dec 1: MolES Seminar: Scott Phillips, Penn State University

    Mon Dec 1, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Monday, Dec. 1, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PST Polymeric Materials with Amplified Responses to Specific Applied Signals This presentation will describe strategies for creating functional polymeric materials that provide amplified responses to specific stimuli. One approach employs end-capped polymers that depolymerize completely from head-to-tail when the end-cap is removed from the polymer in response to a stimulus. Demonstrated applications of these polymers include shape-shifting materials, plastics that are easily recycled, self-powered pumps, point-of-care diagnostics, as well as controlled release chemistry.       Bio: Scott Phillips is the Martarano Associate Professor of Chemistry at the Pennsylvania State University.  He earned his Ph.D. from Paul A. Bartlett at UC Berkeley in 2004 and trained as a postdoctoral fellow in George Whitesides’ group (Harvard).  He started his independent career at Penn State in 2008.  His research interests include: (i) developing thermally stable detection and signal amplification reagents for use in point-of-care diagnostics; (ii) developing exceedingly inexpensive but high performance diagnostic devices for use in resource poor environments; and (iii) designing new classes of stimuli-responsive plastics that display amplified and autonomous responses for biomedical and environmental applications. He has been recognized for his achievements by the Beckman Foundation, the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, DARPA (Young Faculty Award), 3M, NSF (CAREER), Popular Mechanics, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Eli Lilly, Thieme Chemistry, and others.        Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend.

  • Dec 1: Human Centered Design & Engineering Master's Info Session

    Mon Dec 1, 2014 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm | Monday, Dec. 1, 2014, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. PST Join the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) to learn more about the HCDE Master's degree. All sessions are held from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in Sieg Hall, Room 420, on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Learn more and apply at hcde.uw.edu/ms. Campus location: Sieg Hall (SIG) Campus room: 420 Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Dec 3: Designing Technology to Support Self-Experimentation for Health with Julie Kientz

    Wed Dec 3, 2014 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2014, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PST Designing Technology to Support Self-Experimentation for Health Julie Kientz, HCDE Associate Professor December 3, 2014 4:30–5:20 p.m. Mary Gates Hall (MGH), room 241 Learn more at hcde.uw.edu/current-issues-in-hcde Campus location: Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Campus room: 241 Event sponsors: Human Centered Design & Engineering, University of Washington Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • Dec 25: Christmas (no classes)

    Thu Dec 25, 2014 12:00 am | Thursday, Dec. 25, 2014 University holiday, no classes Year: 2014 Quarter: Autumn

  • Jan 1: New Year's Day (no classes)

    Thu Jan 1, 2015 12:00 am | Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015 University holiday, no classes Year: 2015 Quarter: Winter

  • Jan 15: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: Bruce Dunn, Professor of Materials Science, UCLA

    Thu Jan 15, 2015 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, 4 - 5 p.m. PST The Clean Energy Institute Interdisciplinary Seminar Series was established to bring distinguished leaders in the field of clean energy to campus to present their research and meet students, postdocs, and faculty from departments across the Colleges of Arts & Sciences, Engineering, and the Environment. CEI seminars take place regularly throughout the quarter on Thursday afternoons. Campus room: TBD Event sponsors: UW Clean Energy Institute

  • Jan 19: Martin Luther King Day (no classes)

    Mon Jan 19, 2015 12:00 am | Monday, Jan. 19, 2015 University holiday, no classes Year: 2015 Quarter: Winter

  • Jan 21: CEE Career Fair

    Wed Jan 21, 2015 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm | Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015, 1 - 4 p.m. PST The CEE Career Fair attracts hundreds of CEE  grad and undergrad students as well as pre-engineering students from the College of Engineering.   Students’ interests range from “general civil engineering” to specific areas of engineering emphasis covered by the Department, including construction, transportation, geotechnical, structural, water resources/ hydrology/fluid mechanics, and environmental engineering. Students: The CEE Career Fair is open to all students.  Registration is not required. Employers Register now. A late registration fee of $15 applies after January 7, 2015. Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: North Ballroom Event sponsors: UW Civil & Environmental Engineering More info: www.ce.washington.edu…

  • Jan 21: CEE Career Fair

    Wed Jan 21, 2015 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm | Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015, 1 - 4 p.m. PST The goal of the CEE Career Fair is to connect students and employers who are interested in civil and environmental engineering.   Typically, hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students attend.   Students’ interests range from “general civil” to specific areas of engineering emphasis covered by the Department including construction, transportation, geotechnical, structural, hydrology/hydrodynamics, and environmental engineering.  For more information and to register online, visit: www.ce.washington.edu…. Also, join us for the Chair’s Happy Hour Reception for employer reps and alumni following the fair.  As is now the tradition, the Chair, Greg Miller, hosts a Happy Hour Reception for attending employer reps and alumni from 4 to 6pm.  Employer reps and alumni are invited to the reception for refreshments, the Chair’s welcome and the State of the Department overview, and to meet and mingle with faculty and other industry reps. Register early for the CEE Career Fair.  Space is limited.  Late registration fee applies after January 7, 2015. If you have any questions, please feel to contact us at ceadvice@uw.edu. Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: South Ballroom

  • Jan 22: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Jan 22, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PST Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Jan 29: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: Antonio Jesus Conejo Navarro, Professor of Integrated Systems Engineering, Ohio State

    Thu Jan 29, 2015 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, 4 - 5 p.m. PST The Clean Energy Institute Interdisciplinary Seminar Series was established to bring distinguished leaders in the field of clean energy to campus to present their research and meet students, postdocs, and faculty from departments across the Colleges of Arts & Sciences, Engineering, and the Environment. CEI seminars take place regularly throughout the quarter on Thursday afternoons. Campus room: TBD Event sponsors: UW Clean Energy Institute

  • Jan 29: ENGINEERING EXPLORATION NIGHT

    Thu Jan 29, 2015 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm | Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. PST Registration opens later in autumn quarter. Engineering Exploration Night connects engineering alumni and students to discuss engineering careers and fields. Students meet with a diverse group of industry professionals in a "speed date" format. Alumni have the opportunity to: Be a mentor to students considering the pursuit of a degree in engineering. Share with students your experiences as a professional engineer. Answer students' burning questions about engineering fields and professional careers. The event is open to pre-engineers, freshmen and sophomores and includes dinner. Each year, we seek 30+ engineering alumni from all disciplines. Interested alumni, please contact: Kelly Williams kvw9880@uw.edu 206-221-5072 Campus location: McCarty Hall (MCC) Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering More info: www.engr.washington.edu…

  • Jan 29: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Jan 29, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PST Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Feb 5: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Feb 5, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PST Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Feb 12: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: Antoine Kahn, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Pirinceton University

    Thu Feb 12, 2015 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015, 4 - 5 p.m. PST The Clean Energy Institute Interdisciplinary Seminar Series was established to bring distinguished leaders in the field of clean energy to campus to present their research and meet students, postdocs, and faculty from departments across the Colleges of Arts & Sciences, Engineering, and the Environment. CEI seminars take place regularly throughout the quarter on Thursday afternoons. Campus room: TBD Event sponsors: UW Clean Energy Institute

  • Feb 12: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Feb 12, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PST Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Feb 16: President's Day (no classes)

    Mon Feb 16, 2015 12:00 am | Monday, Feb. 16, 2015 University holiday, no classes Year: 2015 Quarter: Winter

  • Feb 19: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Feb 19, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PST Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Feb 26: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Feb 26, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PST Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Feb 28: WiSE Conference - Dare to Be WiSE

    Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:00 am - 5:00 pm | Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. PST The 2015 Women in Science & Engineering Conference Dare to Be WiSE The WiSE conference is a day devoted to celebrate women in engineering academics and careers. The day-long event offers educational and professional enrichment, bringing pre-college, undergraduate and graduate students together with faculty, administrators, and professional women. Attend workshops designed specifically for the high school, college/university student and professional engineers.   Network and meet with employers of engineering graduates, talk to friends and representatives from engineering and science departments and UW community.   Enjoy a catered lunch and plenty of time to network with employers, faculty and students. Event sponsors: Hosted by UW Engineering Student Academic Services with generous sponsorship from corporations and organizations. , For information about sponsoring WiSE, please contact Jenny Selby at jselby@uw.edu or (206) 543-0874. Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: www.engr.washington.edu…

  • Mar 5: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Mar 5, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Mar. 5, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PST Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Mar 12: Business Plan Practicum Resource Nights

    Thu Mar 12, 2015 6:00 pm - 7:50 pm | Thursday, Mar. 12, 2015, 6 - 7:50 p.m. PDT Business Plan Competition/Environmental Innovation Challenge (BPC/EIC) Resource Nights, offered throughout winter quarter by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, bring in experts from the local entrepreneurial community to teach various aspects of new venture creation, encompassing topics such as idea generation, the business plan, financials for start-ups, legal issues, bootstrapping your start-up, and how to pitch to investors. Attending BPC/EIC Resource Nights is a great way to prepare for the Business Plan Competition, the Environmental Innovation Challenge, and beyond. Resource Nights are open to all students and the public. Class lectures are recorded and can be watched live. A link to the MediaSite recording is posted to the class schedule website each Thursday; each session will be available to watch throughout winter and spring quarter. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 104 Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page, Undergrad Intranet Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship Facebook: www.facebook.com… Twitter: twitter.com… More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Apr 23: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: Ross Baldick, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas

    Thu Apr 23, 2015 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, Apr. 23, 2015, 4 - 5 p.m. PDT The Clean Energy Institute Interdisciplinary Seminar Series was established to bring distinguished leaders in the field of clean energy to campus to present their research and meet students, postdocs, and faculty from departments across the Colleges of Arts & Sciences, Engineering, and the Environment. CEI seminars take place regularly throughout the quarter on Thursday afternoons. Campus room: TBD Event sponsors: UW Clean Energy Institute