Upcoming Calendar Events

  • Apr 24: Structural Engineers of 1962 World's Fair

    Thu Apr 24, 2014 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm | Thursday, Apr. 24, 2014, 5:30 - 8 p.m. PDT Please join The Structural Engineers Foundation of Washington as they present “The Structural Engineers of the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair". The reception will begin at 5:30pm, the film begins at 6:00pm. Campus location: Architecture Hall (ARC) Campus room: 147 Event sponsors: The Structural Engineers Foundation of Washington More info: arch.be.washington.edu…

  • Apr 25: Engineering Discovery Days - K-8 exhibits

    Fri Apr 25, 2014 9:00 am - 2:00 pm | See: maps.google.com… Friday, Apr. 25, 2014, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. PDT Students and faculty from all UW engineering departments share their work with students, teachers, families and the community. The 2-day event brings over 9,000 guests to campus to participate in engineering innovation through 115-plus exhibits and information sessions. Friday focuses on younger students in grades K-8, their families and teachers. Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering and Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: www.engr.washington.edu…

  • Apr 26: Engineering Discovery Days - All Ages

    Sat Apr 26, 2014 9:00 am - 2:00 pm | Loew Hall and engineering buildings Saturday, Apr. 26, 2014, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. PDT Students and faculty from all UW engineering departments share their work with K-12 students, teachers, families and the community. Everyone is welcome to join us for hands-on fun and learning. Engineering Discovery Days continues on Saturday, April 27, 9am to 2pm with information sessions for high school students interested in studying engineering at the UW. Admission cost: FREE Event sponsors: University of Washington College of Engineering, engrdays@uw.edu, 206-543-1770 Jessica Perkins More info: www.engr.uw.edu…

  • Apr 29: 2014 BPC - Investment Round

    Tue Apr 29, 2014 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Tuesday, Apr. 29, 2014, 1 - 5 p.m. PDT Giant trade-show event. Teams set up a booth and make their investment pitch (over and over!) to the judges. Announcement of advancing teams at 6:00 PM Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: Lyceum and Ballroom Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Paccar Kiosks, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • Apr 29: MolES/Nano Seminar: Adah Almutairi, UC San Diego

    Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Tuesday, Apr. 29, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PDT Adah Almutairi, PhD Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Nanoengineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, UC San Diego Hosted by Suzie Pun The Art of Falling Apart: Exploiting Nanomaterial Disassembly for Health Sciences This presentation will explore our lab’s recent progress in designing nanomaterials that fall apart in response to biological or external triggers and demonstrating their feasibility for use in imaging and drug delivery. Most notably, we have developed polymeric nanoparticles that degrade to release their contents in response to the biochemical characteristics of inflammation (~100 µM H2O2) and low power near infrared, which can safely penetrate living tissue. We are examining the use of the inflammation-responsive material for disease-specific drug delivery in models of arthritis and in activatable MRI/near infrared imaging agents, and the use of light-responsive particles for on-demand drug release in the eye to treat retinal degeneration. Other materials under development include a variety of light-responsive polymers that degrade rapidly because they are designed to cyclize upon irradiation, and a polymer that degrades in response to visible wavelengths, which should enable triggered release through skin without complex pulsed lasers. We have also recently introduced a method to tune pH-responsive release rates of growth factors that maintains the structural integrity and activity of these delicate proteins. This approach could find use in combination with our facile, scalable method of creating layered tissue culture scaffolds to control cell fates in both space and time. We are currently applying this density modifier-based method toward the development of an in vitro model of 3D organized neural development.  Adah Almutairi is the director of UC San Diego's Center of Excellence in Nanomedicine and Engineering, a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary research collaborative developing tools for the future of biology and medicine (part of the Institute for Engineering in Medicine). Her own research group, the Laboratory for Bioresponsive Materials, creates novel smart materials for on-demand drug delivery, regeneration of damaged tissue, and safe image-based diagnosis. She came to UC San Diego in 2008 from UC Berkeley, where she worked with Professor Jean Fréchet to develop several nanoprobes for in vivo imaging.  Prior to that, she completed her PhD in Materials Chemistry at UC Riverside on polymers for electromechanical actuation. Prof. Almutairi has won an NIH New Innovator Award and been invited to speak at universities and conferences around the world, from Stockholm, Sweden, to Doha, Qatar, to Changchun, China.  Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • Apr 30: Technology Commercialization

    Wed Apr 30, 2014 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm | Wednesday, Apr. 30, 2014, 3:30 - 5:20 p.m. PDT The Program on Technology Commercialization series is open to the entire CoE community. How can we most efficiently move technology from the academic laboratory to product and market? The revised Program on Technology Commercialization (PTC) course sequence is designed to provide students with the fundamentals surrounding this process and suggest how we can most efficiently do this translational process. Spring Quarter’s Introductory Course (BIOEN 504 - Wednesdays & Fridays, 3:30-5:20pm, Electrical Engineering Building 037) will feature outstanding guest lecturers from the local entrepreneurial community sharing knowledge, expertise, and personal experiences as they relate to topics such as: Business opportunity (risk) Markets Entrepreneurship vs. intrapreneurship Selling your business idea (communication) How to start and run a company Management IP and product development Ethics in business and R&D Marketing, sales and distribution Networking with industry experts Developing nations -- huge opportunities Subscribe to the PTCI listserv at https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/ptci for weekly updates. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 037

  • May 1: Graduate Funding Information Service Drop-in Hours

    Thu May 1, 2014 10:00 am - 11:00 am | Thursday, May 1, 2014, 10 - 11 a.m. PDT The Graduate Funding Information Service (GFIS) works with current and admitted UW graduate students. GFIS helps students identify and use different resources to locate funding opportunities for graduate school-related expenses including tuition, research, and conference and research travel. Students can seek answers to their questions during drop-in advising hours, can schedule individual appointments, or can request information by email. Campus location: Allen Library (ALB) Campus room: Research Commons, Allen South Ground Floor, Room G86A Event sponsors: UW Libraries, UW Graduate School, UW Information School More info: commons.lib.washington.edu…

  • May 1: CoE scholarship application closes

    Thu May 1, 2014 5:00 pm | Thursday, May 1, 2014, 5 p.m. PDT The UW College of Engineering's online scholarship application, which opened April 1, 12:00 p.m., will close May 1, 5:00 p.m. Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering More info: www.engr.washington.edu…

  • May 1: Formula SAE car unveiling

    Thu May 1, 2014 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm | Thursday, May 1, 2014, 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. PDT Come check us out as we proudly display the 2014 combustion and electric cars for the first time!  You're welcome to arrive as early as 5:30pm. Convenient parking is available in the Central Plaza Garage (15th Ave NE and 41st St.) with access directly to Kane Hall. Thank you and we look forward to seeing all of you at the event! Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 130 Event sponsors: UW Mechanical Engineering and UW Formula Motorsports Facebook: www.facebook.com… More info: us1.campaign-archive1.com…

  • May 2: HCDE Undergraduate Info Session

    Fri May 2, 2014 11:30 am - 12:30 pm | Friday, May 2, 2014, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. PDT Bring all of your questions about the Bachelor of Science in HCDE to our info session! Campus location: Sieg Hall (SIG) Campus room: 233 More info: hcde.uw.edu…

  • May 2: Technology Management MBA Online Information Session

    Fri May 2, 2014 12:00 pm - 12:30 pm | Online Webinar Friday, May 2, 2014, 12 - 12:30 p.m. PDT The Technology Management MBA (TMMBA) Program will reshape the way you work in teams, evolve the way you think about leadership and provide new perspectives for tackling complex business challenges. Attend this 30 minute online Information Session to learn more about the program, get your questions answered, and see if this 18-month journey is right for you.  Spouses and guests are always welcome. Please Register HereAbout TMMBA The 18-month TMMBA Program is one of three options for working professionals who want to earn an MBA through the Foster School of Business. Designed for people who are passionate about technology and entrepreneurism, the program offers a comprehensive business management curriculum with an emphasis on innovation and leadership. Modeled on an Executive MBA format, students benefit from a full range of support and services. Classes take place at the Eastside Executive Center in Kirkland, where TMMBA students learn from UW Foster faculty who are thought leaders in their fields. Earning a Foster MBA from the TMMBA Program, you’ll learn alongside talented peers and join an extensive network of high-caliber professionals and innovators from around the world. Distributions: Internet, Intranet Event sponsors: TMMBA Program, ​tmmba@uw.edu More info: crm.orionondemand.com…

  • May 5: Engineers Without Borders celebration

    Mon May 5, 2014 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm | Monday, May 5, 2014, 6 - 7:30 p.m. PDT Please join us in celebrating our chapter's many accomplishments.  The evening will include heavy apps, local beer and wines, interactive project demonstrations, games, music and a Silent Auction. Your support benefits sustainable community-driven development programs around the world, as well as advancing the technical and leadership skills of our student and professional members. Local Beer & Wines Deserts lovingly created by EWB UW Students Interactive Project Demonstrations Games, Music, & Silent Auction Buy tickets online. $40 general admission; $30 for students. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: Walker Ames Room, 220 Event sponsors: Engineers without Borders™ University of Washington chapter Facebook: www.facebook.com…

  • May 6: MolES/Nano Seminar: Je-Kyun Park, KAIST

    Tue May 6, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PDT Je-Kyun Park Professor, Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Hosted by Deok-Ho Kim Versatile Microfluidic Platforms for Cell and Tissue Analysis Functional biomicrofluidics has as a key role in realizing micro total analysis systems (μTAS) as well as the next generation bio-tools for cell screening, diagnostics, and tissue engineering. Recent progress of lab-on-a-chip technology is still challenging for the development of micro/nano fluidic assays based on biomimetic microenvironment for organ function-on-a-chip and single-cell screening platform.  In this presentation, a novel approach to improve conventional microfluidics in cell or tissue-based analysis and diagnostics is introduced and discussed. Particularly, I will focus on droplet-based biomicrofluidics using hydrogel microcapsule arrays, which enables the isolation of lipid-rich strains of microalgae. This device may provide a novel screening platform, especially for various microbes directly harvested from the natural environment. A microfluidic immunohistochemistry platform with a quantum dot (QD) double-staining method will also be addressed to give a new insight of biofunctional microfluidics in pathological analysis of breast tissue in patients. The microfluidic multiple biomarker quantification method using QD nanoparticles can be applied to the cancer cell studies and development of diagnostic tools for personalized medicine. Je-Kyun Park is a Professor of Bio and Brain Engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). He also holds joint position as an Affiliated Professor of KAIST Institute for the NanoCentury. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in biotechnology from KAIST in 1992. Prior to joining KAIST, he worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (1996–1997) and as Chief Research Engineer at the LG Electronics Institute of Technology in Korea (1992–2002). His expertise spans interdisciplinary fields of biotechnology, bioelectronics and bioMEMS, with special emphasis on biomolecular diagnostics, micro total analysis systems (μTAS), cell-based screening platforms, and biomedical devices. He has been an editorial board member of several international journals, including Lab on a Chip, Biosensors and Bioelectronics, and BioChip Journal. From 2011, he has served as an Executive Technical Program Committee Member of the International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (μTAS Conference) and a Vice President of the Korean BioChip Society. He is the co-author of 8 book chapters, 109 patents, and more than 120 peer-reviewed scientific papers in the field of integrative bioengineering, including microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip, and BioMEMS for cell/tissue engineering. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • May 7: Technology Commercialization

    Wed May 7, 2014 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm | Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 3:30 - 5:20 p.m. PDT The Program on Technology Commercialization series is open to the entire CoE community. How can we most efficiently move technology from the academic laboratory to product and market? The revised Program on Technology Commercialization (PTC) course sequence is designed to provide students with the fundamentals surrounding this process and suggest how we can most efficiently do this translational process. Spring Quarter’s Introductory Course (BIOEN 504 - Wednesdays & Fridays, 3:30-5:20pm, Electrical Engineering Building 037) will feature outstanding guest lecturers from the local entrepreneurial community sharing knowledge, expertise, and personal experiences as they relate to topics such as: Business opportunity (risk) Markets Entrepreneurship vs. intrapreneurship Selling your business idea (communication) How to start and run a company Management IP and product development Ethics in business and R&D Marketing, sales and distribution Networking with industry experts Developing nations -- huge opportunities Subscribe to the PTCI listserv at https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/ptci for weekly updates. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 037

  • May 8: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: George Crabtree, Argonne National Laboratory

    Thu May 8, 2014 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, May 8, 2014, 4 - 5 p.m. PDT George Crabtree Director, JCESR Argonne National Laboratory University of Illinois at Chicago JCESR: Beyond Li-ion Batteries The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) develops transformational concepts and technologies for portable electricity storage for transportation and stationary electric storage for the electricity grid.  Electrified transportation replaces foreign oil with domestic electricity, and utility-scale electric storage enables the widespread penetration of variable wind and solar generation.  JCESR looks beyond Li-ion technology to new energy storage materials and phenomena to achieve a factor of five increase in performance and reduction in cost needed to realize transformational societal outcomes.   JCESR will leave three legacies: a library of fundamental scientific knowledge of materials and phenomena for next-generation batteries, demonstration of transformational battery prototypes suitable for scale up to manufacturing for transportation and the grid, and a new end-to-end integrated operational paradigm for battery research and development spanning discovery research, design, and demonstration. George Crabtree holds the ranks of Senior Scientist, Distinguished Fellow and Associate Division Director in the Materials Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. He has won numerous awards for his research, most recently the Kammerlingh Onnes Prize in 2003 for his work on the physics of vortices in high temperature superconductors. This prestigious prize is awarded once every three years; Dr. Crabtree is its second recipient. He has won the University of Chicago Award for Distinguished Performance at Argonne twice, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Award for Outstanding Scientific Accomplishment in Solid State Physics four times, a notable accomplishment. He has an R&D 100 Award for his pioneering development of Magnetic Flux Imaging Systems. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a charter member of ISI's Highly Cited Researchers in Physics, and a Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Crabtree has served as Chairman of the Division of Condensed Matter of the American Physical Society, as a Founding Editor of the scientific journal Physica C, as Divisional Associate Editor of Physical Review Letters, as Chair of the Advisory Committee for the National Magnet Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida, and as Editor of several review issues of Physica C devoted to superconductivity. He has published more than 350 papers in leading scientific journals, has collected over 14,000 career citations, and has given approximately 100 invited talks at national and international scientific conferences. His research interests include materials science, sustainable energy, nanoscale superconductors and magnets, vortex matter in superconductors, highly correlated electrons in metals. He has led workshops for the Department of Energy on hydrogen, solar energy, superconductivity, and materials under extreme environments, co-chaired the Undersecretary of Energy's assessment of DOE's Applied Energy Programs. He has testified before the U.S. Congress on the hydrogen economy and on meeting sustainable energy challenges. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 125 Event sponsors: UW Clean Energy Institute

  • May 13: MolES/Nano Seminar: Zhaohui Zhong, University of Michigan

    Tue May 13, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PDT Zhaohui Zhong Assistant Professor Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan Hosted by Xiaodong Xu Graphene Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics Carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, offer unparalleled opportunities for next generation electronic and optoelectronic devices which not only have smaller sizes but often exhibit unique functionalities. The research in our group aims at exploiting material properties and device applications enabled uniquely by these low dimensional carbon nanomaterials. In this talk, I will discuss our group’s recent works on these fascinating nanomaterials. Topics will include: 1) investigation of photocarrier generation and extraction on graphene optoelectronic devices using scanning photocurrent spectroscopy; 2) graphene heterostructure based ultra-broadband and high responsivity photodetector; and 3) graphene nanoelectronic heterodyne sensors offering high speed and high sensitivity vapor detection. Zhaohui Zhong received his B.S. and M.S. in Chemistry from Nanjing University (China) in 1998 and 2000, and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard University in 2005. From 2005 to 2008, he was a postdoctoral associate at Cornell Center for Nanoscale Systems. He joined the faculty of EECS at the University of Michigan in August, 2008. He is a recipient of MRS graduate student award (2005), ACS Petroleum Fund Doctoral New Investigator (2011), and NSF CAREER award (2013). His research lies on the frontiers of nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, and has been cited for more than 3000 times. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • May 13: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: Tobin J. Marks, Northwestern University

    Tue May 13, 2014 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 4 - 5 p.m. PDT New Materials Strategies for Hybrid Electronic Circuitry This lecture focuses on the challenging design, realization, and implementation of new materials for creating unconventional electronic circuitry. Fabrication methodologies to achieve these goals include high-throughput, large-area, high-resolution printing techniques.  Materials design topics to be discussed include: 1. Rationally designed high-mobility p- and n-type organic semiconductors for printed organic CMOS, 2. Polycrystalline and amorphous oxide semiconductors for transparent and  mechanically flexible electronics, 3) Self-assembled and printable high-k nanodielectrics enabling ultra-large capacitance, low leakage, high breakdown fields, minimal trapped interfacial charge, and device radiation hardness.  4) Combining these materials sets to fabricate a variety of high-performance thin-film transistor-based circuitries.  5) The relevance of these advances for unconventional photovoltaics. Tobin J. Marks Biosketch Tobin Marks is Vladimir N. Ipatieff Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University, and Distinguished Adjunct Professor at Texas A&M Qatar and at Korea University.  He received a B.S. degree in Chemistry from the University of Maryland (1966) and Ph.D. from MIT (1971) in Inorganic Chemistry.  His research interests include transition metal and f element organometallic chemistry; catalysis; vibra¬tional spectroscopy; nuclear magnetic resonance; synthetic facsimiles of metallo¬protein active sites; carcinostatic metal complexes; solid state chemistry and low-dimensional molecular metals; nonlinear optical materials; polymer chemistry; tetrahydroborate coordination chemistry; macrocycle coordination chemistry; laser-induced chemistry and isotope separation; molecular electro-optics;  metal-organic chemical vapor deposition; polymerization catalysis; printed flexible electronics; solar energy; and transparent conductors. Marks has received American Chemical Society National Awards in Polymeric Materials, 1983; Organometallic Chemistry, 1989; Inorganic Chemistry, 1994; Chemistry of Materials, 2001; Distinguished Service in Inorganic Chemistry, 2008; Organic Chemistry (Cope Senior Scholar), 2010; Catalysis (Somorjai), 2013.  He received the 2000  American Chemical Society Cotton Medal; 2001 American Chemical Society Willard Gibbs Medal; 2001 N. American Catalysis Society Burwell Award; 2001 American Chemical Society Linus Pauling Medal; 2002 American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal; 2003 German Chemical Society Karl Ziegler Prize; 2004 Royal Society of Chemistry Frankland Medal, 2005  American Chemical Society Bailar Medal; Member, U. S. National Academy of Sciences (1993); Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1993), Member, German National Academy of Sciences (2005); Fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry (2005); US National Medal of Science (2007); Fellow, Chemical Research Society of India (2008); Fellow, Materials Research Society (2009):  Honorary Fellow, Indian Academy of Sciences (2010). He received the 2008 Spanish Principe de Asturias Prize for Scientific Research; 2009 N. American Catalysis Society Pines Award; 2009 Taylor Materials Research Award, Penn. State U.; 2009 Von Hippel Award, Materials Research Society; 2010  American Chemical Society Nichols Medal; 2010 Distinguished Affiliated Professor Award and Wilhelm Manchot Prize, Technical U. of Munich; 2010 American Chemical Society Mosher Award; 2011 Schulich Prize, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology; 2011 Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences; 2012 American Chemical Society Richards Medal; the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Award in the Chemical Sciences; member, National Academy of Engineering, 2012; Distinguished Alumni Award and Election, Circle of Discovery, University of Maryland, 2012; American Chemical Society Somorjai Award for Creative Research in Catalysis, 2012; Alan G. MacDiarmid Medal, University of Pennsylvania, 2013. He received Doctor of Science degrees honoris causa, from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2011, the University of South Carolina in 2011, and the Ohio State University in 2012. Peer-reviewed publications: 1115; h-index = 128 (on 61,200 citations); Issued US Patents: 223 Event sponsors: Clean Energy Institute More info: chemgroups.northwestern.edu…

  • May 13: Health Innovators Seminar: Value in Healthcare Innovation

    Tue May 13, 2014 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PDT An exciting array of informative and provocative seminars has been designed to bring the community of innovators, corporate and academic, together.  Each seminar will be followed by an informal networking opportunity. “Demonstrating Value in Health Innovation: Lessons from Comparative Effectiveness Research” Larry Kessler, ScD, Chair of UW Department of Health Services and former Director, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, will consider the coming necessity for innovations to demonstrably provide value and how the experience with comparative effectiveness can help innovators gather the needed evidence. The Health Innovators Collaborative Seminars are free but please RSVP to help us plan. Campus location: William H. Foege Bioengineering (BIOE) Campus room: Foege Auditorium (S060) More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • May 14: Technology Commercialization

    Wed May 14, 2014 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm | Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 3:30 - 5:20 p.m. PDT The Program on Technology Commercialization series is open to the entire CoE community. How can we most efficiently move technology from the academic laboratory to product and market? The revised Program on Technology Commercialization (PTC) course sequence is designed to provide students with the fundamentals surrounding this process and suggest how we can most efficiently do this translational process. Spring Quarter’s Introductory Course (BIOEN 504 - Wednesdays & Fridays, 3:30-5:20pm, Electrical Engineering Building 037) will feature outstanding guest lecturers from the local entrepreneurial community sharing knowledge, expertise, and personal experiences as they relate to topics such as: Business opportunity (risk) Markets Entrepreneurship vs. intrapreneurship Selling your business idea (communication) How to start and run a company Management IP and product development Ethics in business and R&D Marketing, sales and distribution Networking with industry experts Developing nations -- huge opportunities Subscribe to the PTCI listserv at https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/ptci for weekly updates. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 037

  • May 15: Community of Innovators awards

    Thu May 15, 2014 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, May 15, 2014, 3:30 - 5 p.m. PDT Join us to honor UW engineering students, faculty and staff who make exceptional and meaningful contributions to the College. Campus location: Paul G. Allen Center For Computer Science & Engineering (CSE) Campus room: Atrium Event sponsors: University of Washington College of Engineering More info: www.engr.washington.edu…

  • May 15: Scholars' Studio: Predictions Research @the Commons

    Thu May 15, 2014 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm | Thursday, May 15, 2014, 4 - 5:30 p.m. PDT Grad Students and Postdocs: Looking for opportunities to present your research? Preparing for a conference or scholarly presentation and looking for presentation ideas? Need feedback on your presentation style? Interested in meeting scholars outside your discipline? Submit a proposal for a 5-minute TED-style talk and join us at the 2013-2014 Scholars’ Studio series. ​Scholars’ Studio is a fun, informal event that features 10 rapid-fire ignite-style presentations (5 minutes each) given by graduate students and postdocs doing research on topics related to an interdisciplinary theme.  Hosted by the UW Libraries Research Commons and The Graduate School, Scholars' Studio gives students the opportunity to share their research across disciplines, make connections and build presentation skills. Campus location: Allen Library (ALB) Campus room: Research Commons, Allen South Ground Floor, Presentation Place Event sponsors: UW Libraries Research Commons, UW Graduate School More info: commons.lib.washington.edu…

  • May 16: UW Undergraduate Research Symposium

    Fri May 16, 2014 11:00 am - 6:00 pm | Friday, May 16, 2014, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. PDT The Annual UW Undergraduate Research Symposium provides an exciting venue for undergraduates from all academic disciplines to present their research via poster, oral presentation, and performance sessions. It affords an opportunity for students, faculty, and the community to discuss cutting edge research topics and to examine the connection between research and education. This year, over 1,000 undergraduates will present their work in the Symposium. Admission cost: Free Campus location: Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Event sponsors: Undergraduate Research Program, 206-543-4282 More info: exp.uw.edu…

  • May 20: MolES/Nano Seminar: Masayoshi Watanabe

    Tue May 20, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Tuesday, May 20, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PDT Masayoshi Watanabe Professor, Chemistry and Biotechnology Yokohama National University Hosted by Minoru Taya Ionic Liquids as Neoteric Solvents and Innovative Materials Ionic liquids are now being recognized as the third group of solvents, following water and organic solvents. They are easily available and possess unique properties such as nonvolatility, high thermal stability, and designability, which make it possible to use them on demand and under unusual conditions. This lecture will focus on understanding of the unique properties of ionic liquids and on their utilization as neoteric solvents and electrolytes for new materials and devices that can help realize a sustainable society. More specifically, ionic liquids can serve as neoteric electrolytes in electrochemical-energy-conversion systems. H+- and Li+-conducting ionic liquids are prepared in order to realize innovative fuel cells and batteries. Ionic liquids also exhibit unique solubility toward polymers; this opens up a new field of intelligent materials chemistry. One of the application areas of polymer/ionic liquid composite materials includes ionic polymer actuators. These challenges aim at developing new materials and devices for a sustainable society on the basis of a thorough understanding of ionic liquids. Masayoshi Watanabe is a Professor of Yokohama National University. He received his Ph.D. (1983) degree from Waseda University. He joined Sophia University as a research associate. After a visiting scientist with Professor Royce W. Murray at University of North Carolina (1988–1990), he moved to Yokohama National University in 1992 and was promoted to a full Professor in 1998. He received the Lecture Award for Young Scientists from the Chemical Society of Japan in 1991, the Award for Creative Work from the Electrochemical Society of Japan in 2006, the Award of the Society of Polymer Science, Japan in 2006, the Best Teacher Award from Yokohama National University in 2007, and Distinguished Research Award of Yokohama National University in 2012. Prof. Watanabe's research interest has been mainly concerned with “ionics” and “nano-structured materials”. Ionics has become an important scientific area for the realization of key materials for advanced electrochemical devices, which supports a sustainable society. He is one of research leaders in the fields of ionic liquids and polymer electrolytes in the world. Recent research activity has been expanded to nano-structured materials, including block copolymer assembly in ionic liquids. He has published more than 290 original research papers and 150 books and reviews in these and relating fields. Number of Citations > 12000, h-index > 57. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • May 21: Technology Commercialization

    Wed May 21, 2014 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm | Wednesday, May 21, 2014, 3:30 - 5:20 p.m. PDT The Program on Technology Commercialization series is open to the entire CoE community. How can we most efficiently move technology from the academic laboratory to product and market? The revised Program on Technology Commercialization (PTC) course sequence is designed to provide students with the fundamentals surrounding this process and suggest how we can most efficiently do this translational process. Spring Quarter’s Introductory Course (BIOEN 504 - Wednesdays & Fridays, 3:30-5:20pm, Electrical Engineering Building 037) will feature outstanding guest lecturers from the local entrepreneurial community sharing knowledge, expertise, and personal experiences as they relate to topics such as: Business opportunity (risk) Markets Entrepreneurship vs. intrapreneurship Selling your business idea (communication) How to start and run a company Management IP and product development Ethics in business and R&D Marketing, sales and distribution Networking with industry experts Developing nations -- huge opportunities Subscribe to the PTCI listserv at https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/ptci for weekly updates. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 037

  • May 22: Business Plan Competition - Final

    Thu May 22, 2014 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm | Thursday, May 22, 2014, 1 - 4:30 p.m. PDT Top teams give their presentations to seven entrepreneur judges, who then choose the winning teams. Open to the public. Campus location: Dempsey Hall (DEM) Campus room: 3rd Floor, Anthony's Forum Distributions: Internet, Intranet, Paccar Kiosks, Megaplex, Graduate Lounge and Web Page Event sponsors: Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship More info: www.foster.washington.edu…

  • May 22: CEI Interdisciplinary Seminar: Kory Hedman, Arizona State University Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering

    Thu May 22, 2014 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Thursday, May 22, 2014, 4 - 5 p.m. PDT Managing variable renewable resources in the smart grid This presentation will give an overview of the existing challenges to integrate variable renewable resources within the electric power grid. An overview regarding how variable renewable resources affect ancillary services within the power grid will be given. The presentation will then discuss the recent push to transition from deterministic to stochastic programming to handle the uncertainty caused by variable renewable resources. Such stochastic programs for the large-scale mixed integer program, unit commitment, do not scale well. Progressive hedging, however, is a dual decomposition algorithm that has a trivially parallelizable structure that lends itself to high performance computing. Results will be presented based on the use of this algorithm and the talk will conclude with an overview of other smart grid advances that are being developed in order to facilitate the integration of variable renewable resources. Kory W. Hedman Assistant Professor, Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering Arizona State University Kory W. Hedman is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ. He received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Operations Research from the University of California at Berkeley in 2007 and 2010 respectively. Dr. Hedman holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering, specializing in power engineering, and he holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Economics. Dr. Hedman previously worked for the California ISO (CAISO), Folsom, CA, on transmission planning and he has worked with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Washington, D.C., on transmission switching. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 125 Event sponsors: UW Clean Energy Institute More info: webapp4.asu.edu…

  • May 26: Memorial Day (no classes)

    Mon May 26, 2014 12:00 am | Monday, May 26, 2014 University holiday, no classes Year: 2014 Quarter: Spring

  • May 27: MolES/Nano Seminar: Guozhong Cao, Materials Science and Engineering, UW

    Tue May 27, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PDT Guozhong Cao Boeing-Steiner Professor of Materials Science & Engineering University of Washington Design nanostructures and interfaces for efficient energy conversion and storage Nanostructured materials possess unique physical properties that are not found in their bulk counterparts, and some properties can be tailored by change the characteristic dimension of the nanomaterials. Devices and systems based on appropriately designed and fabricated nanostructures and nanomaterials can demonstrate remarkably enhanced performances. The large specific surface area and short diffusion distance can surely enhance the interface and transport kinetics, while the surface energy and defects will impact the phase transition and reaction thermodynamics. In this presentation, I will use three examples to illustrate how energy conversion and storage efficiency can be significantly improved through careful design and engineering of materials on the nanometer and micrometer scales and through surface chemistry modification. The first example is the manipulation and control of nanostructures and surface chemistry of porous carbon for supercapacitors. The second example is nanostructured electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. Nanostructured electrodes have demonstrated specific energy and specific power improvements with excellent cyclic stability. Further enhancement in energy density can be achieved through introduction of defects and modification of surface chemistry. Lastly I will discuss the nanostructured photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum dot-sensitized solar cells and inverted polymer solar cells, and the impacts of surface chemistry and morphology on the power conversion efficiency.  Dr. Guozhong Cao is Boeing-Steiner Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Chemical Engineering, and Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA. He received his PhD degree from Eindhoven University of Technology (the Netherlands), MS from Shanghai Institute of Ceramics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, and BS from East China University of Science and Technology (China). He has published over 280 SCI journal papers, authored and edited 7 books, and presented over 200 invited talks and seminars. His current research is focused mainly on chemical processing of nanomaterials for energy related applications including solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, and supercapacitors Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • May 28: Technology Commercialization

    Wed May 28, 2014 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm | Wednesday, May 28, 2014, 3:30 - 5:20 p.m. PDT The Program on Technology Commercialization series is open to the entire CoE community. How can we most efficiently move technology from the academic laboratory to product and market? The revised Program on Technology Commercialization (PTC) course sequence is designed to provide students with the fundamentals surrounding this process and suggest how we can most efficiently do this translational process. Spring Quarter’s Introductory Course (BIOEN 504 - Wednesdays & Fridays, 3:30-5:20pm, Electrical Engineering Building 037) will feature outstanding guest lecturers from the local entrepreneurial community sharing knowledge, expertise, and personal experiences as they relate to topics such as: Business opportunity (risk) Markets Entrepreneurship vs. intrapreneurship Selling your business idea (communication) How to start and run a company Management IP and product development Ethics in business and R&D Marketing, sales and distribution Networking with industry experts Developing nations -- huge opportunities Subscribe to the PTCI listserv at https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/ptci for weekly updates. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 037

  • Jun 3: Coffee with the Dean

    Tue Jun 3, 2014 8:30 am - 9:30 am | Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 8:30 - 9:30 a.m. PDT 8:30 - Networking and Breakfast (eggs, bacon and sausage, potatoes, fruit, juice, coffee) 9:00 - Dean's talk Submit questions by May 28 to smartin3@uw.edu. Campus location: University of Washington Club (FAC)

  • Jun 3: MolES/Nano Seminar: Ryan Gill, University of Colorado

    Tue Jun 3, 2014 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm | Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. PDT Ryan T. Gill Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Associate Director of the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute University of Colorado  Hosted by Francois Baneyx The Genome Design-Build-Test Shop The era of genome engineering has arrived. Synthetic DNA technologies can now generate sufficient DNA to construct tens of thousands of genes in parallel; enough to synthesize several complete microbial genomes at the same time. Genome sequencing has advanced to the point where such genomes can be completely sequenced in < 1 day for about <$1000 using a benchtop sequencer. These technologies were used in the creation of the first synthetic genome. Such genome-construction technology was first applied to the copying of existing genomes, thus avoiding any significant design phase. Future applications will seek to develop artificial genomes that will be designed to encode industrially relevant functions; such as production of biofuels, sustainable chemicals, pharmaceuticals, industrial enzymes, etc. Such applications will require that we are able to not only identify genes encoding functions that enable such applications but also combinations of such genes, and combinations of such combinations, that together result in optimal organism performance. We are developing a range of new technologies for designing genomes based upon the i) construction and use of “ideal” chassis strains, ii) efficient identification of geneto-phenotype design rules, iii) automated “rational” combinatorial mutation library generation, and iv) parallel interrogation of such libraries to identify combinatorial design rules. This presentation will describe the first generation of such technologies, the current state of next-generation approaches, and the most recent application of such tools to design and construct microbial genomes relevant to sustainable fuels and chemicals production. Ryan T. Gill is Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Colorado and Associate Director of the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute. Professor Gill’s research focuses on the development of new technologies for engineering biology with specific applications in the production of chemicals, fuels, and pharmaceuticals. In particular, Prof. Gill’s group works in the areas of metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and directed evolution, and primarily receives support from the Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, and private industry. Professor Gill joined the faculty at the University of Colorado in 2001, after postdoctoral and PhD research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Maryland, respectively. In addition to his research efforts, Prof. Gill has helped to start a range of new ventures, including the Colorado Center for Biorefining and Biofuels, Opxbio, and Biota, Inc. These efforts have been recognized in various manners; including, a National Science Foundation CAREER award, a Dupont Young Professor Award, as well as being named University of Colorado Inventor of the Year. Campus location: Johnson Hall (JHN) Campus room: 102 Event sponsors: The weekly seminar series organized by Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute provides a forum for bringing national and international leaders in nanoscale science and technology to campus, and for graduate students enrolled in our Dual Ph.D. program in Nanotechnology to present their research. The campus and public are welcome to attend. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • Jun 3: Health Innovators Seminar: IT and Healthcare

    Tue Jun 3, 2014 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm | Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. PDT An exciting array of informative and provocative seminars has been designed to bring the community of innovators, corporate and academic, together.  Each seminar will be followed by an informal networking opportunity. “IT can make a big difference in health: Why hasn’t it?” Peter Neupert, Operating Partner of Health Evolution Partners and former VP of the Health Solutions Group at Microsoft will draw on his extensive experience with both institutional and consumer aspects of health IT to consider the enormous potential and serious pitfalls that make this area of innovation so challenging. The Health Innovators Collaborative Seminars are free but please RSVP to help us plan. Campus location: William H. Foege Bioengineering (BIOE) Campus room: Foege Auditorium (S060) More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • Jun 4: Technology Commercialization

    Wed Jun 4, 2014 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm | Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 3:30 - 5:20 p.m. PDT The Program on Technology Commercialization series is open to the entire CoE community. How can we most efficiently move technology from the academic laboratory to product and market? The revised Program on Technology Commercialization (PTC) course sequence is designed to provide students with the fundamentals surrounding this process and suggest how we can most efficiently do this translational process. Spring Quarter’s Introductory Course (BIOEN 504 - Wednesdays & Fridays, 3:30-5:20pm, Electrical Engineering Building 037) will feature outstanding guest lecturers from the local entrepreneurial community sharing knowledge, expertise, and personal experiences as they relate to topics such as: Business opportunity (risk) Markets Entrepreneurship vs. intrapreneurship Selling your business idea (communication) How to start and run a company Management IP and product development Ethics in business and R&D Marketing, sales and distribution Networking with industry experts Developing nations -- huge opportunities Subscribe to the PTCI listserv at https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/ptci for weekly updates. Campus location: Electrical Engineering Building (EE1) Campus room: 037

  • Jun 5: Engineering Diamond Awards

    Thu Jun 5, 2014 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm | Thursday, June 5, 2014, 6 - 9 p.m. PDT Join Dean Michael Bragg at the 2014 Diamond Awards Dinner on Thursday, June 5, 2014. The UW Engineering Diamond Awards honor outstanding alumni and friends who have made significant contributions to the field of engineering. This year, we celebrate: Eric B. Denton, P.E., '51 BS & MS Chemical Engineering Distinguished Achievement in Industry Simon Sze, '60 MS Electrical Engineering Distinguished Achievement in Academia Randy Kurosky, '88 BS Ceramic Engineering Entrepreneurial Excellence Daniel J. Evans, '48 BS, '49 MS Civil Engineering Distinguished ServiceBrad Fitzpatrick, '02 BS Computer Science & Engineering Early Career Campus location: Student Union Building (HUB) Campus room: Lyceum Event sponsors: UW College of Engineering More info: www.engr.washington.edu…

  • Jun 16: The Future of Brain Stimulation: Parkinson’s, Depression, Alzheimer’s and Beyond

    Mon Jun 16, 2014 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm | Monday, June 16, 2014, 7 - 9 p.m. PDT Dr. Andres Lozano from the University of Toronto will kick off the NeuroFutures summit with a talk on “The Future of Brain Stimulation: Parkinson’s, Depression, Alzheimer’s and beyond" (see his related TED Talk here). Afterwards, he will discuss his work with science educator and author David Heil, and field questions from the audience. Campus location: Kane Hall (KNE) Campus room: 130 Event sponsors: Organization supporting this talk include the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, University of Washington, Northwest NeuroNeighborhood, Allen Institute for Brain Science and Oregon Health & Science University. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • Jun 17: NeuroFutures Summit

    Tue Jun 17, 2014 5:00 pm | UW Tower and Hotel Deca Tuesday, June 17, 8 a.m. - Wednesday, June 18, 2014, 5 p.m. PDT The NeuroFutures Summit is a two-day conference with keynote presentations, panel discussions, lightning talks, poster sessions, and an evening reception. Meeting attendees will learn the state of the art in selected areas, present and discuss their work, and interact with neurotechnology leaders from the Pacific Northwest and across North America in a small conference setting. Event sponsors: Organization supporting this talk include the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, University of Washington, Northwest NeuroNeighborhood, Allen Institute for Brain Science and Oregon Health & Science University. More info: depts.washington.edu…

  • Jul 4: Independence Day (no classes)

    Fri Jul 4, 2014 12:00 am | Friday, July 4, 2014 University holiday, no classes Year: 2014 Quarter: Summer

  • Sep 1: Labor Day (no classes)

    Mon Sep 1, 2014 12:00 am | Monday, Sep. 1, 2014 University holiday, no classes Year: 2014 Quarter: Autumn